Gewerkenegg Castle

Idrija, Slovenia

Gewerkenegg Castle dominates the Idrija city. It was erected at the beginning of the 16th century to serve as the administrative headquarters and warehouse of the Idrija mine, then the second largest mercury mine in the world. The now beautifully restored Renaissance complex experienced a Baroque renovation in the middle of the 18th century when the inner arcaded courtyard was created and painted with attractive decorative frescoes.

The castle now houses the Idrija Museum, whose central exhibit-Five Centuries of Mercury Mining and the Town of Idrija-offers a survey of the half-millennium history of the oldest mining town in Slovenia. It also offers an exhibit of Idrija lace, a replica of a room in an Idrija miner's home, peasant frescoes, memorial rooms of the writer France Bevk and the politician Aleš Bebler, and a collection of paintings donated by the gallery owner Valentina Orsini Mazza. The castle also provides rooms and a concert hall for the Idrija Music School. Throughout the year, the museum organizes various events, presentations, and receptions in the castle hall. The Museum Evenings lecture series is especially popular. In summer, the Castle Evenings program of cultural events, mostly concerts, moves into the castle courtyard.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

More Information

www.slovenia.info

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emo Della Mea (2 years ago)
Bellissimo castello veramente ben tenuto. Posizione splendida. Merita visitarlo. Contiene la Storia della Citta' e delle miniere di Mercurio che in passato hanno fatto ricca la cittadina.
Iztok Krzisnik (2 years ago)
Vredno ogleda
나정 (2 years ago)
Milen Drumev (2 years ago)
Град музей за миньорската индустрия,добивало се е живак в мината.
Anže Barle (3 years ago)
Zanimive zbirke, vredno ogleda.
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