The original castle at Jablje was first mentioned in 1268, while the current structure was built by the noble house of Lamberg around 1530. The castle subsequently passed through the hands of the Rasp family, the barons Mosconi, and was from 1780 until the end of World War II owned by the barons Lichtenberg. Though it survived the war largely intact, the castle was nationalized and thoroughly looted during the following years, being first converted into apartments and then serving as an experimental facility of the Biotechnical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana.

After a thorough renovation carried out between 1999 and 2006, the castle was a major protocolary site during the 2008 Slovene presidency of the EU. Today it hosts the so-called Center for European Perspective and is listed as a cultural monument. Its greatest asset is a set of frescoes by the baroque painter Franc Jelovšek, including an unusual depiction of a camel-riding Chinese tambourine player.

The castle is open for visitors every other Saturday at 11:00, with appointments available for groups.

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Founded: 1530
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

petra skušek (18 months ago)
Grad renesančnega videza, v osnovi namenjen za protokolarne prireditve, v njem potekajo poroke - ima prijetno notranje dvorišče za kakšno majhno pogostitev in povprečno poročno dvorano. Do gradu se lahko pride po stopnicah z lepimi zelenimi oboki. Od gradu se nadaljuje peš pot po gozdu.
Nina Fugina (18 months ago)
Really beautiful on the outside, too bad we couldn’t see the inside.
Laura Stojnšek (2 years ago)
Lep ambient. Primeren za kakšne seminarje in izobraževanja
Zeng Rogers (3 years ago)
nice and old Castle!
Primož Godec (4 years ago)
Nice location with great historical atmosphere. This is nice place for weddings in nice castle or just place where you can have a walk in amazing nature.
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