Willibaldsburg Castle

Eichstätt, Germany

The castle complex on the Willibaldsberg was begun in 1355 and extended in the second half of the 16th century under Martin von Schaumberg. It was transformed into an impressive residence by Elias Holl during the reign of Prince-Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen (1595-1612) – at this stage of the building's history the towers were crowned by onion domes.

Gemmingen also laid out the renowned botanical garden Hortus Eystettensis. Based on the copperplate engravings illustrating the plant collection which were created in 1613 by Basilius Besler, the Bastion Garden opened in 1998 reproduces the plant world of the original botanical garden.

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Details

Founded: 1355
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

P Knut (7 months ago)
A great natural history museum in the Altmuthal! Wonderful fossils! Great for kids! My favorite is the horseshoe crab fossil that also contains the animal's final footprints. There is a great view of the area from up there. Not a large museum, can get through pretty quick, but it is a good walk from the parking areas.
Fernando AC (16 months ago)
Not really interesting.
Fernando AC (16 months ago)
Not really interesting.
Rob and Jo Weston (2 years ago)
The castle museum is really good but the Jura museum is now closed. We went to see archaeopteryx so we're a bit disappointed. Still good value though, the tower has good views of Eichstatt and acoustics for singing!
Jo Rob Weston (2 years ago)
The castle museum is really good but the Jura museum is now closed. We went to see archaeopteryx so we're a bit disappointed. Still good value though, the tower has good views of Eichstatt and acoustics for singing!
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