The exact history of the Wolfenstein Castle is unclear. The archaeological excavations have dated the construction to the mid-12th century. The first written document dates from 1283 when Gottfried von Sulzbürg changed his name Wolfenstein and started the nobility. Hans von Wolfenstein died childless in 1462 and the castle was moved to the possession of Bohemian (Czech) king. Wolfstein lost its importance in the 16th century after been damaged in War of the Succession of Landshut in 1504. The castle was abandoned and fell into disrepair.

Today, the ruins of Wolfenstein are in good condition. It went through extensive excavations and renovations in the 1990s.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kenneth Holloway (2 years ago)
Great castle and view... disappointed because it was closed last time
Mindy Lebb (3 years ago)
Was a good visit, can bring the dogs,nice grounds for a walk!
C. David Kader (3 years ago)
Great views of countryside, awesome ruins to climb around. Easily accessible from road and no entry fees.
Marc Cofer (3 years ago)
Larger cssrle ruins than expected. Tower open to view point. Best views...wow!
Giedre Zib (3 years ago)
We have visited this place two times. It is not that simple to get there by foot, but really worth it. From the hill you can see the whole town. Amazing view. I recommend you to visit it.
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