Pfünz Roman Fort

Walting, Germany

Pfünz Roman Fort, Castra Vetoniana, was a Roman cohort camp near Pfünz, a village in the municipality of Walting. It was built in about 90 AD on a 42-metre-high Jurassic hillspur between the valley of the Altmühl and that of the Pfünzer Bach stream. it is a component of the Rhaetian Limes which was elevated in 2005 to the status of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Of historical importance are the remains of the double V-shaped ditches hewn out of the rock in front of the position, the one on the western rampart being the best preserved. In 1998, as part of the construction of a high pressure water system, the Bavarian State Office for Monument Protection carried out further test excavations. The archaeological record and rich finds from Pfünz, some of which are very rare, are seen as reasons for further studies in the future.

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Address

Bergweg 7, Walting, Germany
See all sites in Walting

Details

Founded: 90 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Al Steinsbacher (4 months ago)
Beauty
Kathrin Mansour (4 months ago)
Toll für einen Spaziergang . Der Aufstieg und die Aussicht grandios. Ein Muss für jeden, der nicht nur Erdbeerlimes kennt.
Christian Mayerhofer (5 months ago)
I've known Pfünz since I was an altar boy (tent camp on the mountain opposite the Roman fort). I've lived along the Altmühl since birth; sometimes Riedenburg, sometimes Dinkelsbühl. In between, I find myself near the Danube; Ulm, Ingolstadt. I mainly work and live where others go on vacation. Come to Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg and see for yourself.
Wisdom Hear (2 years ago)
Thank you lord
M M (2 years ago)
Cool
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