The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the first American president. Located almost due east of the Reflecting Pool and the Lincoln Memorial, the monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss, is both the world's tallest stone structure and the world's tallest obelisk (169m).

Construction of the monument began in 1848, and was halted from 1854 to 1877 due to a lack of funds, a struggle for control over the Washington National Monument Society, and the intervention of the American Civil War. Although the stone structure was completed in 1884, internal ironwork, the knoll, and other finishing touches were not completed until 1888.

The original design was by Robert Mills, but he did not include his proposed colonnade due to a lack of funds, proceeding only with a bare obelisk. Despite many proposals to embellish the obelisk, only its original flat top was altered to a pointed marble pyramidion, in 1884. Upon completion, it became the world's tallest structure. The monument held this designation until 1889, when the Eiffel Tower was completed in Paris, France.

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Details

Founded: 1848-1888
Category: Statues in United States

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.nps.gov

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jared Halphin (12 months ago)
Wow! Such an interesting building in the middle of DC. When I went it was still under renovation...hopefully it opens up soon to go inside and tour. You can see the monument from almost everywhere in DC. Lots of history. You'll have to do some research and see why it is multiple colors! Very interesting story that goes along with it.
Ankita Singh (12 months ago)
This place is very much spectacular, and the best part about this place is that there is no fee to visit this Monument. It is very near by to white house, world war II Memorial and lincoln memorial. If you start from White House then it will be very easy to cover all these three monuments. It marks the center of the four main monuments which mark as the most important buildings of Washington DC.
Kevin P (12 months ago)
Awesome memorial to George Washington and the Capitol City of America. It seems to always be getting worked on, I wish I could've taken the elevator up to the observation level, but it was closed for renovations. I guess I'll have to come back!
viktoria suedmeyer (13 months ago)
It is the symbol of D.C. Usually the mall is very crowded, but it is beautiful to walk down there. Since some time now there's a construction site on/in the Monument preventing to enter it (usually that's possible and gives you a great view). I recommend seeing the Monument at night!
Cody Hirsch (14 months ago)
Seen from all over the Capitol, the Washington Monument is one of the most iconic and significant of the cities many monuments. I went to the monument first thing so I could always have a reference point when exploring. In 2018 there was construction blocking the sidewalk around a portion of the monument and also limiting how close you could get. Thankfully, there are public restrooms around the monument which are cleverly disguised to look like the surrounding buildings. Be prepared to put on the miles as the White House is over 1 mile away by foot.
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