National World War II Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The World War II Memorial is dedicated to Americans who served in the armed forces and as civilians during World War II. Consisting of 56 pillars and a pair of small triumphal arches surrounding a plaza and fountain, it sits on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument. The memorial was dedicated by President George W. Bush in 2004.

The Freedom Wall is on the west side of the memorial, with a view of the Reflecting Pool and Lincoln Memorial behind it. The wall has 4,048 gold stars, each representing 100 Americans who died in the war.

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Founded: 2004
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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manuel Garcia (12 months ago)
Wow is not the word for it. Very beautiful and breathtaking we have been on the road for a 37 day 20 state vacation. Every state we have visited has been amazing. Me and my wife love traveling. Last year we did 13 states in 21 days. I have an awesome wife who loves to travel too. She plans it all out a year in advance and we get a month off together and take off. The world is a beautiful place to see and I'd do it over and over again with my lovely wife my partner for life.
John Cantello (17 months ago)
In such a fast pace world. An amazing way to ground yourself back to earth while appreciating all the freedoms we are blessed to have. Thankful to those who paid the ultimate price.
Michael Brown (19 months ago)
My grandfather (my fathers father) served in the Army and fought in the Pacific Theatre in World War Two so this was a must visit and it did not disappoint. The fountains were really spectacular and the monuments on each end (one for the Pacific Theatre and one for the Atlantic Theatre) were well done and very ornate. If it is a hot day, you CAN take your shoes off and soak them in the fountain. This is a tribute to the soldiers in WW2 doing the same at the end of the war in Europe. Very enjoyable visit
KAREN STRATOTI (20 months ago)
What amazing experience to see the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument and Capitol building! Some many diverse cultures and people! Exactly how this country was founded. The United States Constitution is as valid today as it was 245 years ago! Don't diminish its power to govern. WE THE PEOPLE!
Robert Hobbs (21 months ago)
"Through stone architecture and bronze sculptures, the World War II Memorial recognizes the ways Americans served, honors those who fell, and recognizes the victory they achieved to restore freedom and end tyranny around the globe." The national park service dedicated this memorial in 2004, finally, a memorial on our national mall that honored the greatest generation. The memorial is located directly between The Lincoln and Washington monuments, allowing for those to be honored, to do so, in the shadow of two of the nations most notable President's. What I personally loved about this monument is that it isn't a memorial solely dedicated to the millions who fell in battle, or served in general, but it is truly a well deserved memorial to those serving on the home front and assisting the war efforts, as well. It is truly a memorial that honors collectively all of the efforts that went into World War II and brought the allies victory. It is an incredible memorial that a visit to the national mall without seeing it, wouldn't be complete. I've often ran into and seen numerous world war II veterans visiting the site, a generation of heroes that will soon be gone from earth, I hope when others visit, they too may take the time to stop, talk, and thank one of these men in the presence of the monument built to forever honor and remember them.
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The Church of St Eustace was built between 1532-1632. St Eustace"s is considered a masterpiece of late Gothic architecture. The church’s reputation was strong enough of the time for it to be chosen as the location for a young Louis XIV to receive communion. Mozart also chose the sanctuary as the location for his mother’s funeral. Among those baptised here as children were Richelieu, Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, future Madame de Pompadour and Molière, who was also married here in the 17th century. The last rites for Anne of Austria, Turenne and Mirabeau were pronounced within its walls. Marie de Gournay is buried there.

The origins of Saint Eustache date back to 13th century. The church became a parish church in 1223, thanks to a man named Jean Alais who achieved this by taxing the baskets of fish sold nearby, as granted by King Philip Augustus. To thank such divine generosity, Alais constructed a chapel dedicated to Sainte-Agnès, a Roman martyr. The construction of the current church began in 1532, the work not being finally completed until 1637. The name of the church refers to Saint Eustace, a Roman general of the second century AD who was burned, along with his family, for converting to Christianity, and it is believed that it was the transfer of a relic of Saint Eustache from the Abbey to Saint-Denis to the Church of Saint Eustache which resulted in its naming. Jeanne Baptiste d"Albert de Luynes was baptised here.

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The church is an example of a Gothic structure clothed in Renaissance detail. The church is relatively short in length at 105m, but its interior is 33.45m high to the vaulting. At the main façade, the left tower has been completed in Renaissance style, while the right tower remains a stump. The front and rear aspects provide a remarkable contrast between the comparatively sober classical front and the exuberant rear, which integrates Gothic forms and organization with Classical details. The L"écoute sculpture by Henri de Miller appears outside the church, to the south. A Keith Haring sculpture stands in a chapel of the church.

The Chapel of the Virgin was built in 1640 and restored from 1801 to 1804. It was inaugurated by Pius VII on the 22nd of December, 1804 when he came to Paris for the coronation of Napoleon. The apse chapel, with a ribbed cul-de-four vault, has at its centre a sculpture of the Virgin and Child of Jean-Baptiste Pigalle that the painter Thomas Couture highlighted by three large paintings.

With 8,000 pipes, the organ is reputed to be the largest pipe organ in France, surpassing the organs of Saint Sulpice and Notre Dame de Paris. The organ originally constructed by P.-A. Ducroquet was powerful enough for the premiere of Hector Berlioz" titanic Te Deum to be performed at St-Eustache in 1855.