National World War II Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The World War II Memorial is dedicated to Americans who served in the armed forces and as civilians during World War II. Consisting of 56 pillars and a pair of small triumphal arches surrounding a plaza and fountain, it sits on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument. The memorial was dedicated by President George W. Bush in 2004.

The Freedom Wall is on the west side of the memorial, with a view of the Reflecting Pool and Lincoln Memorial behind it. The wall has 4,048 gold stars, each representing 100 Americans who died in the war.

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Founded: 2004
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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jill king (20 days ago)
Visiting on Memorial Day or Veterans Day is perfect time for Washington D.C. trip. Also in the Spring, when they have Cherry Blossom Festival. Cost of the sites we visited were free. So many sites were within walking distances. Good walking shoes is a must. Machine Parking Meters. Walked to Vietnam, Korean, Womens, WW II, Lincoln, Jefferson and Martin Luther King Jr Memorial. All in 1 day. We decided to recreate a picnic from our past ( fried chicken, home made cucumber salad, hard boil eggs, chips and dip, fruits, snacks & drinks ). It was so enjoyable and stress free just having a picnic. We didn't have to leave and come back and fight for good parking spot again. Also saved money on food and time, trying to find a good restaurant for lunch. We parked next to the LAKE and after relaxation we continued our site seeing. I got to check off my bucket lists of A historical sites to visit. So many in 1 day. So worth your time. And take many pictures as u can.
G Aquino (23 days ago)
The average tourist would probably be underwhelmed seeing this memorial as it is dwarfed in grandeur and stature by the surrounding iconic structures such as the Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument. The place might hold more relevance for veterans and the friends and relatives of those who served and died in battle. The most noticeable structures are the tall plaques with the names of then US states and territories, including the now-independent Philippines.
Matthew Cotton (53 days ago)
This monument was awesome. Even with the government shutdown, it was beautiful. A great piece of American history that is remembered in a fashionable manner. Truly an architectural masterpiece. I recommend checking this monument out if you are in the DC area and have some free time; maybe you could even take some of your relatives who are vets!
Carla Filla (2 months ago)
We visited this memorial at night with a guide and I highly recommend that. He explained all the meaning behind the symbols used in the creation of the memorial. Additionally, he helped us understand how they made the memorial so that it wouldn't conflict with the landscape of the area. It was pretty fascinating! Fountains we're off though in winter.
Isaac Oguji (3 months ago)
It was a great time here. I loved what they did with the waters. Pretty a good way to relax and cool off your legs. Lots of people around makes it more fun. Best enjoyed in the evenings and public holidays. I love the cradle and there are great scenes and lovely views to have great photos. Better still, it's just opposite the Washington Monument.
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