National World War II Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The World War II Memorial is dedicated to Americans who served in the armed forces and as civilians during World War II. Consisting of 56 pillars and a pair of small triumphal arches surrounding a plaza and fountain, it sits on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument. The memorial was dedicated by President George W. Bush in 2004.

The Freedom Wall is on the west side of the memorial, with a view of the Reflecting Pool and Lincoln Memorial behind it. The wall has 4,048 gold stars, each representing 100 Americans who died in the war.

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Founded: 2004
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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Hobbs (3 months ago)
"Through stone architecture and bronze sculptures, the World War II Memorial recognizes the ways Americans served, honors those who fell, and recognizes the victory they achieved to restore freedom and end tyranny around the globe." The national park service dedicated this memorial in 2004, finally, a memorial on our national mall that honored the greatest generation. The memorial is located directly between The Lincoln and Washington monuments, allowing for those to be honored, to do so, in the shadow of two of the nations most notable President's. What I personally loved about this monument is that it isn't a memorial solely dedicated to the millions who fell in battle, or served in general, but it is truly a well deserved memorial to those serving on the home front and assisting the war efforts, as well. It is truly a memorial that honors collectively all of the efforts that went into World War II and brought the allies victory. It is an incredible memorial that a visit to the national mall without seeing it, wouldn't be complete. I've often ran into and seen numerous world war II veterans visiting the site, a generation of heroes that will soon be gone from earth, I hope when others visit, they too may take the time to stop, talk, and thank one of these men in the presence of the monument built to forever honor and remember them.
Bruce Hrabak (5 months ago)
One of our families favorite monuments. So much to see at 1 place. All 50 states, amazing views of the fountains with the Washington monument in the background. Moving wall of stars for those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. Great quotes and 2 sides for the pacific and Atlantic. Really well done and very beautiful.
Kevin Wright (9 months ago)
Very impressive and awe inspiring. I sometimes despair if we, as a country, and as a world, could pull together like this again.
Victoria Jackson (9 months ago)
Beautiful site so glad had a chance to visit the white house was fully blocked though
D. Eric Harris (10 months ago)
March On Washington 2020, Get Your Knee Off Our Necks!!!
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Kirkjubøargarður

Kirkjubøargarður ('Yard of Kirkjubøur', also known as King"s Farm) is one of the oldest still inhabited wooden houses of the world. The farm itself has always been the largest in the Faroe Islands. The old farmhouse dates back to the 11th century. It was the episcopal residence and seminary of the Diocese of the Faroe Islands, from about 1100. Sverre I of Norway (1151–1202), grew up here and went to the priest school. The legend says, that the wood for the block houses came as driftwood from Norway and was accurately bundled and numbered, just for being set up. Note, that there is no forest in the Faroes and wood is a very valuable material. Many such wood legends are thus to be found in Faroese history.

The oldest part is a so-called roykstova (reek parlour, or smoke room). Perhaps it was moved one day, because it does not fit to its foundation. Another ancient room is the loftstovan (loft room). It is supposed that Bishop Erlendur wrote the 'Sheep Letter' here in 1298. This is the earliest document of the Faroes we know today. It is the statute concerning sheep breeding on the Faroes. Today the room is the farm"s library. The stórastovan (large room) is from a much later date, being built in 1772.

Though the farmhouse is a museum, the 17th generation of the Patursson Family, which has occupied it since 1550, is still living here. Shortly after the Reformation in the Faroe Islands in 1538, all the real estate of the Catholic Church was seized by the King of Denmark. This was about half of the land in the Faroes, and since then called King"s Land (kongsjørð). The largest piece of King"s Land was the farm in Kirkjubøur due to the above-mentioned Episcopal residence. This land is today owned by the Faroese government, and the Paturssons are tenants from generation to generation. It is always the oldest son, who becomes King"s Farmer, and in contrast to the privately owned land, the King"s Land is never divided between the sons.

The farm holds sheep, cattle and some horses. It is possible to get a coffee here and buy fresh mutton and beef directly from the farmer. In the winter season there is also hare hunting for the locals. Groups can rent the roykstovan for festivities and will be served original Faroese cuisine.

Other famous buildings directly by the farmhouse are the Magnus Cathedral and the Saint Olav"s Church, which also date back to the mediaeval period. All three together represent the Faroe Island"s most interesting historical site.