National World War II Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The World War II Memorial is dedicated to Americans who served in the armed forces and as civilians during World War II. Consisting of 56 pillars and a pair of small triumphal arches surrounding a plaza and fountain, it sits on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument. The memorial was dedicated by President George W. Bush in 2004.

The Freedom Wall is on the west side of the memorial, with a view of the Reflecting Pool and Lincoln Memorial behind it. The wall has 4,048 gold stars, each representing 100 Americans who died in the war.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 2004
Category:

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Hobbs (10 months ago)
"Through stone architecture and bronze sculptures, the World War II Memorial recognizes the ways Americans served, honors those who fell, and recognizes the victory they achieved to restore freedom and end tyranny around the globe." The national park service dedicated this memorial in 2004, finally, a memorial on our national mall that honored the greatest generation. The memorial is located directly between The Lincoln and Washington monuments, allowing for those to be honored, to do so, in the shadow of two of the nations most notable President's. What I personally loved about this monument is that it isn't a memorial solely dedicated to the millions who fell in battle, or served in general, but it is truly a well deserved memorial to those serving on the home front and assisting the war efforts, as well. It is truly a memorial that honors collectively all of the efforts that went into World War II and brought the allies victory. It is an incredible memorial that a visit to the national mall without seeing it, wouldn't be complete. I've often ran into and seen numerous world war II veterans visiting the site, a generation of heroes that will soon be gone from earth, I hope when others visit, they too may take the time to stop, talk, and thank one of these men in the presence of the monument built to forever honor and remember them.
Bruce Hrabak (12 months ago)
One of our families favorite monuments. So much to see at 1 place. All 50 states, amazing views of the fountains with the Washington monument in the background. Moving wall of stars for those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. Great quotes and 2 sides for the pacific and Atlantic. Really well done and very beautiful.
Kevin Wright (2 years ago)
Very impressive and awe inspiring. I sometimes despair if we, as a country, and as a world, could pull together like this again.
Victoria Jackson (2 years ago)
Beautiful site so glad had a chance to visit the white house was fully blocked though
D. Eric Harris (2 years ago)
March On Washington 2020, Get Your Knee Off Our Necks!!!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.