The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon and the designer of the primary statue was Daniel Chester French.

Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, 'The Gettysburg Address' and his 'Second Inaugural Address'. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Since 2010, approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

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Eamonn OMahony (16 months ago)
Great just brilliant! Souvenir shop unexpected. Lifts up for those who need it. Statue and walls have been kept immaculate. So impressed with the transcripts of the speeches on opposite walls and of course the statue itself so imposing and a measure of the stature of this so important figure
Mark Davis (16 months ago)
Another great memorial to a great leader. The monument is at the western end of the National Mall. Sitting on the steps and looking eastward, you see the Washington Monument and further in the distance the Capital. This place us always busy, but take you time and read the words. Also, look up and admire the murals. Also it's great to visit at night.
Kevin P (16 months ago)
Awesome experience to see this in person. I wish that there wasn't construction going on at every single attraction on the entire National Mall at the same time, but I understand that's what happens when you go during off peak tourist season (February). The only other downside here is the hoards of people, many of which don't know how to be respectful of a special place while visiting. Others seemed to understand better of where they were and showed proper respect, which was great to see.
George & Linda Preeter (17 months ago)
One of my favorite places in DC. I love Lincoln and this Memorial was very humbling to visit. The view is amazing and to be able to sit on the steps is one for the books. There is also a shop that you can buy trinkets in. While I was there, the tour guide said you can see an extra face in the statue and that there was an error in the writing on the wall. A must visit if you are in DC!
M Velasquez (17 months ago)
Surrounded peace security. No doubt one of the most memorable, valuable and historical places anyone should or could visit through their life journey check list - It's inspiring, motivating and amazingly enjoyable. Every view in that panorama area is definitely designed to be a place to remember. Lastly consider this a place to share beautiful memories with family and friends.
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The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood is one of the main sights of St. Petersburg. The church was built on the site where Tsar Alexander II was assassinated and was dedicated in his memory. Construction began in 1883 under Alexander III, as a memorial to his father, Alexander II. Work progressed slowly and was finally completed during the reign of Nicholas II in 1907. Funding was provided by the Imperial family with the support of many private donors.

Architecturally, the Cathedral differs from St. Petersburg's other structures. The city's architecture is predominantly Baroque and Neoclassical, but the Savior on Blood harks back to medieval Russian architecture in the spirit of romantic nationalism. It intentionally resembles the 17th-century Yaroslavl churches and the celebrated St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow.

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In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the church was ransacked and looted, badly damaging its interior. The Soviet government closed the church in the early 1930s. During the Second World War when many people were starving due to the Siege of Leningrad by Nazi German military forces, the church was used as a temporary morgue for those who died in combat and from starvation and illness. The church suffered significant damage. After the war, it was used as a warehouse for vegetables, leading to the sardonic name of Saviour on Potatoes.

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