The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon and the designer of the primary statue was Daniel Chester French.

Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, 'The Gettysburg Address' and his 'Second Inaugural Address'. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Since 2010, approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1914–1922
Category:

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eamonn OMahony (3 months ago)
Great just brilliant! Souvenir shop unexpected. Lifts up for those who need it. Statue and walls have been kept immaculate. So impressed with the transcripts of the speeches on opposite walls and of course the statue itself so imposing and a measure of the stature of this so important figure
Mark Davis (3 months ago)
Another great memorial to a great leader. The monument is at the western end of the National Mall. Sitting on the steps and looking eastward, you see the Washington Monument and further in the distance the Capital. This place us always busy, but take you time and read the words. Also, look up and admire the murals. Also it's great to visit at night.
Kevin P (3 months ago)
Awesome experience to see this in person. I wish that there wasn't construction going on at every single attraction on the entire National Mall at the same time, but I understand that's what happens when you go during off peak tourist season (February). The only other downside here is the hoards of people, many of which don't know how to be respectful of a special place while visiting. Others seemed to understand better of where they were and showed proper respect, which was great to see.
George & Linda Preeter (4 months ago)
One of my favorite places in DC. I love Lincoln and this Memorial was very humbling to visit. The view is amazing and to be able to sit on the steps is one for the books. There is also a shop that you can buy trinkets in. While I was there, the tour guide said you can see an extra face in the statue and that there was an error in the writing on the wall. A must visit if you are in DC!
M Velasquez (4 months ago)
Surrounded peace security. No doubt one of the most memorable, valuable and historical places anyone should or could visit through their life journey check list - It's inspiring, motivating and amazingly enjoyable. Every view in that panorama area is definitely designed to be a place to remember. Lastly consider this a place to share beautiful memories with family and friends.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.