The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon and the designer of the primary statue was Daniel Chester French.

Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, 'The Gettysburg Address' and his 'Second Inaugural Address'. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Since 2010, approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

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Eamonn OMahony (19 months ago)
Great just brilliant! Souvenir shop unexpected. Lifts up for those who need it. Statue and walls have been kept immaculate. So impressed with the transcripts of the speeches on opposite walls and of course the statue itself so imposing and a measure of the stature of this so important figure
Mark Davis (19 months ago)
Another great memorial to a great leader. The monument is at the western end of the National Mall. Sitting on the steps and looking eastward, you see the Washington Monument and further in the distance the Capital. This place us always busy, but take you time and read the words. Also, look up and admire the murals. Also it's great to visit at night.
Kevin P (19 months ago)
Awesome experience to see this in person. I wish that there wasn't construction going on at every single attraction on the entire National Mall at the same time, but I understand that's what happens when you go during off peak tourist season (February). The only other downside here is the hoards of people, many of which don't know how to be respectful of a special place while visiting. Others seemed to understand better of where they were and showed proper respect, which was great to see.
George & Linda Preeter (20 months ago)
One of my favorite places in DC. I love Lincoln and this Memorial was very humbling to visit. The view is amazing and to be able to sit on the steps is one for the books. There is also a shop that you can buy trinkets in. While I was there, the tour guide said you can see an extra face in the statue and that there was an error in the writing on the wall. A must visit if you are in DC!
M Velasquez (20 months ago)
Surrounded peace security. No doubt one of the most memorable, valuable and historical places anyone should or could visit through their life journey check list - It's inspiring, motivating and amazingly enjoyable. Every view in that panorama area is definitely designed to be a place to remember. Lastly consider this a place to share beautiful memories with family and friends.
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Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.