The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon and the designer of the primary statue was Daniel Chester French.

Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, 'The Gettysburg Address' and his 'Second Inaugural Address'. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Since 2010, approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

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Eamonn OMahony (12 months ago)
Great just brilliant! Souvenir shop unexpected. Lifts up for those who need it. Statue and walls have been kept immaculate. So impressed with the transcripts of the speeches on opposite walls and of course the statue itself so imposing and a measure of the stature of this so important figure
Mark Davis (12 months ago)
Another great memorial to a great leader. The monument is at the western end of the National Mall. Sitting on the steps and looking eastward, you see the Washington Monument and further in the distance the Capital. This place us always busy, but take you time and read the words. Also, look up and admire the murals. Also it's great to visit at night.
Kevin P (12 months ago)
Awesome experience to see this in person. I wish that there wasn't construction going on at every single attraction on the entire National Mall at the same time, but I understand that's what happens when you go during off peak tourist season (February). The only other downside here is the hoards of people, many of which don't know how to be respectful of a special place while visiting. Others seemed to understand better of where they were and showed proper respect, which was great to see.
George & Linda Preeter (13 months ago)
One of my favorite places in DC. I love Lincoln and this Memorial was very humbling to visit. The view is amazing and to be able to sit on the steps is one for the books. There is also a shop that you can buy trinkets in. While I was there, the tour guide said you can see an extra face in the statue and that there was an error in the writing on the wall. A must visit if you are in DC!
M Velasquez (13 months ago)
Surrounded peace security. No doubt one of the most memorable, valuable and historical places anyone should or could visit through their life journey check list - It's inspiring, motivating and amazingly enjoyable. Every view in that panorama area is definitely designed to be a place to remember. Lastly consider this a place to share beautiful memories with family and friends.
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Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

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UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.