The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon and the designer of the primary statue was Daniel Chester French.

Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, 'The Gettysburg Address' and his 'Second Inaugural Address'. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Since 2010, approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

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Eamonn OMahony (39 days ago)
Great just brilliant! Souvenir shop unexpected. Lifts up for those who need it. Statue and walls have been kept immaculate. So impressed with the transcripts of the speeches on opposite walls and of course the statue itself so imposing and a measure of the stature of this so important figure
Mark Davis (42 days ago)
Another great memorial to a great leader. The monument is at the western end of the National Mall. Sitting on the steps and looking eastward, you see the Washington Monument and further in the distance the Capital. This place us always busy, but take you time and read the words. Also, look up and admire the murals. Also it's great to visit at night.
Kevin P (46 days ago)
Awesome experience to see this in person. I wish that there wasn't construction going on at every single attraction on the entire National Mall at the same time, but I understand that's what happens when you go during off peak tourist season (February). The only other downside here is the hoards of people, many of which don't know how to be respectful of a special place while visiting. Others seemed to understand better of where they were and showed proper respect, which was great to see.
George & Linda Preeter (2 months ago)
One of my favorite places in DC. I love Lincoln and this Memorial was very humbling to visit. The view is amazing and to be able to sit on the steps is one for the books. There is also a shop that you can buy trinkets in. While I was there, the tour guide said you can see an extra face in the statue and that there was an error in the writing on the wall. A must visit if you are in DC!
M Velasquez (2 months ago)
Surrounded peace security. No doubt one of the most memorable, valuable and historical places anyone should or could visit through their life journey check list - It's inspiring, motivating and amazingly enjoyable. Every view in that panorama area is definitely designed to be a place to remember. Lastly consider this a place to share beautiful memories with family and friends.
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Church of Our Lady before Týn

The Church of Our Lady before Týn is a dominant feature of the Old Town of Prague and has been the main church of this part of the city since the 14th century. The church's towers are 80 m high and topped by four small spires.

In the 11th century, this area was occupied by a Romanesque church, which was built there for foreign merchants coming to the nearby Týn Courtyard. Later it was replaced by an early Gothic Church of Our Lady before Týn in 1256. Construction of the present church began in the 14th century in the late Gothic style under the influence of Matthias of Arras and later Peter Parler. By the beginning of the 15th century, construction was almost complete; only the towers, the gable and roof were missing. The church was controlled by Hussites for two centuries, including John of Rokycan, future archbishop of Prague, who became the church's vicar in 1427. The roof was completed in the 1450s, while the gable and northern tower were completed shortly thereafter during the reign of George of Poděbrady (1453–1471). His sculpture was placed on the gable, below a huge golden chalice, the symbol of the Hussites. The southern tower was not completed until 1511, under architect Matěj Rejsek.

After the lost Battle of White Mountain (1620) began the era of harsh recatholicisation (part of the Counter-Reformation). Consequently, the sculptures of 'heretic king' George of Poděbrady and the chalice were removed in 1626 and replaced by a sculpture of the Virgin Mary, with a giant halo made from by melting down the chalice. In 1679 the church was struck by lightning, and the subsequent fire heavily damaged the old vault, which was later replaced by a lower baroque vault.

Renovation works carried out in 1876–1895 were later reversed during extensive exterior renovation works in the years 1973–1995. Interior renovation is still in progress.

The northern portal is a wonderful example of Gothic sculpture from the Parler workshop, with a relief depicting the Crucifixion. The main entrance is located on the church's western face, through a narrow passage between the houses in front of the church.

The early baroque altarpiece has paintings by Karel Škréta from around 1649. The oldest pipe organ in Prague stands inside this church. The organ was built in 1673 by Heinrich Mundt and is one of the most representative 17th-century organs in Europe.