The United States Capitol is the seat of the United States Congress. It sits atop Capitol Hill, at the eastern end of the National Mall. Though not at the geographic center of the Federal District, the Capitol forms the origin point for the District's street-numbering system and the District's four quadrants.

The original building was completed in 1800 and was subsequently expanded, particularly with the addition of the massive dome. Like the principal buildings of the executive and judicial branches, the Capitol is built in a distinctive neoclassical style and has a white exterior. Both its east and west elevations are formally referred to as fronts, though only the east front was intended for the reception of visitors and dignitaries.

In 2014, scaffolding was erected around the dome for a restoration project scheduled to be completed by early 2017.

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Founded: 1793-1800
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United States

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

LAHIRU HASARANGA (4 months ago)
There are millions of Local Guides around the world who share reviews, photos, and knowledge on Google Maps. Doing this helps others find great local places, supports small businesses, and can even make it easier for people to get vital information. (Think about the importance of knowing whether a place is wheelchair accessible or the hours of operation for a nearby clinic.) There are many reasons why Local Guides contribute, but whether you love to review vegetarian restaurants or add missing info, you can make a huge impact on a global scale. By sharing your knowledge on Google Maps, you’re telling your story and having it seen by people all around the world. Being a Local Guide could also lead to being featured in a Local Guides video or getting an invitation to Google-hosted Local Guides events like last year’s Summit or this year’s Connect Live. If you have a story you want to tell on camera, tell us about it using this casting form. In addition to helping others, connecting with like-minded Local Guides, and getting your stories told, your contributions could also get you perks. As a special surprise, perks may be offered from time to time to say “thanks!” for being a Local Guide. Recent perks include a digital subscription to The New York Times, free movie tickets from Atom, and discounted redBus tickets. Didn’t get a perk? The Local Guides program is constantly evolving, and so are perks. We are always looking to offer more perks to more Local Guides, so be sure your email preferences have perks emails enabled by visiting your Local Guides home. If you have a suggested partner, or a perk you would like to see offered in your area,
Adam Tuiletufuga (4 months ago)
The Capitol Building is beautiful in form and representation. Removed from the politics of it all, the building has come to represent a democratic society and does so with a level of grandeur not often seen in American architecture. The amount of detail in this building is amazing and the short, but sweet, tour they regularly 6 days a week is highly informative. My favorite room is the Rotunda, which features 8 massive and important paintings that many Americans will have seen in their textbooks during school, such the painting of President Washington's surrendering of power when he left the office (the first peaceful handing over of power). This location is a MUST-SEE when visiting Washington, both the outside of the building and the tour inside.
Paola Cruz (4 months ago)
It was very interesting to be in a place with so much history. If you are a history buff, specifically American history, then it is definitely worth going on the tour. There is so much to learn and every room you walk into is beautiful and detailed. Also, our tour guide was very friendly and took the time to answer everyone’s questions. If you want to do more than the tour and explore everything the Capitol has to offer, it would definitely take about a half day.
Kevin P (4 months ago)
The experience of touring this place is incredible. You get to see such cool rooms and art. I learned a lot on the tour, and wish I had booked through my representative so I could've gotten a gallery pass, but that means I'll have to come back and do it next time!
Erik Mannery (5 months ago)
Beautiful building - don't forget to look up a lot, there is also something new that you will see! The Senate and House chambers were a little surreal to see and the House had a vote going which was fun to sit in on. It was great to get to visit a huge part in the history of democracy.
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Church of the Savior on Blood

The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood is one of the main sights of St. Petersburg. The church was built on the site where Tsar Alexander II was assassinated and was dedicated in his memory. Construction began in 1883 under Alexander III, as a memorial to his father, Alexander II. Work progressed slowly and was finally completed during the reign of Nicholas II in 1907. Funding was provided by the Imperial family with the support of many private donors.

Architecturally, the Cathedral differs from St. Petersburg's other structures. The city's architecture is predominantly Baroque and Neoclassical, but the Savior on Blood harks back to medieval Russian architecture in the spirit of romantic nationalism. It intentionally resembles the 17th-century Yaroslavl churches and the celebrated St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow.

The Church contains over 7500 square metres of mosaics — according to its restorers, more than any other church in the world. The interior was designed by some of the most celebrated Russian artists of the day — including Viktor Vasnetsov, Mikhail Nesterov and Mikhail Vrubel — but the church's chief architect, Alfred Alexandrovich Parland, was relatively little-known (born in St. Petersburg in 1842 in a Baltic-German Lutheran family). Perhaps not surprisingly, the Church's construction ran well over budget, having been estimated at 3.6 million roubles but ending up costing over 4.6 million. The walls and ceilings inside the Church are completely covered in intricately detailed mosaics — the main pictures being biblical scenes or figures — but with very fine patterned borders setting off each picture.

In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the church was ransacked and looted, badly damaging its interior. The Soviet government closed the church in the early 1930s. During the Second World War when many people were starving due to the Siege of Leningrad by Nazi German military forces, the church was used as a temporary morgue for those who died in combat and from starvation and illness. The church suffered significant damage. After the war, it was used as a warehouse for vegetables, leading to the sardonic name of Saviour on Potatoes.

In July 1970, management of the Church passed to Saint Isaac's Cathedral (then used as a highly profitable museum) and proceeds from the Cathedral were funneled back into restoring the Church. It was reopened in August 1997, after 27 years of restoration, but has not been reconsecrated and does not function as a full-time place of worship; it is a Museum of Mosaics. Even before the Revolution it never functioned as a public place of worship; having been dedicated exclusively to the memory of the assassinated tsar, the only services were panikhidas (memorial services). The Church is now one of the main tourist attractions in St. Petersburg.