The United States Capitol is the seat of the United States Congress. It sits atop Capitol Hill, at the eastern end of the National Mall. Though not at the geographic center of the Federal District, the Capitol forms the origin point for the District's street-numbering system and the District's four quadrants.

The original building was completed in 1800 and was subsequently expanded, particularly with the addition of the massive dome. Like the principal buildings of the executive and judicial branches, the Capitol is built in a distinctive neoclassical style and has a white exterior. Both its east and west elevations are formally referred to as fronts, though only the east front was intended for the reception of visitors and dignitaries.

In 2014, scaffolding was erected around the dome for a restoration project scheduled to be completed by early 2017.

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Founded: 1793-1800
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United States

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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LAHIRU HASARANGA (2 years ago)
There are millions of Local Guides around the world who share reviews, photos, and knowledge on Google Maps. Doing this helps others find great local places, supports small businesses, and can even make it easier for people to get vital information. (Think about the importance of knowing whether a place is wheelchair accessible or the hours of operation for a nearby clinic.) There are many reasons why Local Guides contribute, but whether you love to review vegetarian restaurants or add missing info, you can make a huge impact on a global scale. By sharing your knowledge on Google Maps, you’re telling your story and having it seen by people all around the world. Being a Local Guide could also lead to being featured in a Local Guides video or getting an invitation to Google-hosted Local Guides events like last year’s Summit or this year’s Connect Live. If you have a story you want to tell on camera, tell us about it using this casting form. In addition to helping others, connecting with like-minded Local Guides, and getting your stories told, your contributions could also get you perks. As a special surprise, perks may be offered from time to time to say “thanks!” for being a Local Guide. Recent perks include a digital subscription to The New York Times, free movie tickets from Atom, and discounted redBus tickets. Didn’t get a perk? The Local Guides program is constantly evolving, and so are perks. We are always looking to offer more perks to more Local Guides, so be sure your email preferences have perks emails enabled by visiting your Local Guides home. If you have a suggested partner, or a perk you would like to see offered in your area,
Adam Tuiletufuga (2 years ago)
The Capitol Building is beautiful in form and representation. Removed from the politics of it all, the building has come to represent a democratic society and does so with a level of grandeur not often seen in American architecture. The amount of detail in this building is amazing and the short, but sweet, tour they regularly 6 days a week is highly informative. My favorite room is the Rotunda, which features 8 massive and important paintings that many Americans will have seen in their textbooks during school, such the painting of President Washington's surrendering of power when he left the office (the first peaceful handing over of power). This location is a MUST-SEE when visiting Washington, both the outside of the building and the tour inside.
Paola Cruz (2 years ago)
It was very interesting to be in a place with so much history. If you are a history buff, specifically American history, then it is definitely worth going on the tour. There is so much to learn and every room you walk into is beautiful and detailed. Also, our tour guide was very friendly and took the time to answer everyone’s questions. If you want to do more than the tour and explore everything the Capitol has to offer, it would definitely take about a half day.
Kevin P (2 years ago)
The experience of touring this place is incredible. You get to see such cool rooms and art. I learned a lot on the tour, and wish I had booked through my representative so I could've gotten a gallery pass, but that means I'll have to come back and do it next time!
Erik Mannery (2 years ago)
Beautiful building - don't forget to look up a lot, there is also something new that you will see! The Senate and House chambers were a little surreal to see and the House had a vote going which was fun to sit in on. It was great to get to visit a huge part in the history of democracy.
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Craigmillar Castle

Craigmillar is one of Scotland’s most perfectly preserved castles. It began as a simple tower-house residence. Gradually, over time, it developed into a complex of structures and spaces, as subsequent owners attempted to improve its comfort and amenity. As a result, there are many nooks and crannies to explore.

The surrounding gardens and parkland were also important. The present-day Craigmillar Castle Park has fascinating reminders of the castle’s days as a rural retreat on the edge of Scotland’s capital city.

At the core lies the original, late-14th-century tower house, among the first of this form of castle built in Scotland. It stands 17m high to the battlements, has walls almost 3m thick, and holds a warren of rooms, including a fine great hall on the first floor.

‘Queen Mary’s Room’, also on the first floor, is where Mary is said to have slept when staying at Craigmillar. However, it is more likely she occupied a multi-roomed apartment elsewhere in the courtyard, probably in the east range.

Sir Simon Preston was a loyal supporter of Queen Mary, whom she appointed as Provost of Edinburgh. In this capacity, he was her host for her first night as a prisoner, at his townhouse in the High Street, on 15 June 1567. She was taken to Lochleven Castle the following day.

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