The United States Capitol is the seat of the United States Congress. It sits atop Capitol Hill, at the eastern end of the National Mall. Though not at the geographic center of the Federal District, the Capitol forms the origin point for the District's street-numbering system and the District's four quadrants.

The original building was completed in 1800 and was subsequently expanded, particularly with the addition of the massive dome. Like the principal buildings of the executive and judicial branches, the Capitol is built in a distinctive neoclassical style and has a white exterior. Both its east and west elevations are formally referred to as fronts, though only the east front was intended for the reception of visitors and dignitaries.

In 2014, scaffolding was erected around the dome for a restoration project scheduled to be completed by early 2017.

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Founded: 1793-1800
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United States

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

LAHIRU HASARANGA (14 months ago)
There are millions of Local Guides around the world who share reviews, photos, and knowledge on Google Maps. Doing this helps others find great local places, supports small businesses, and can even make it easier for people to get vital information. (Think about the importance of knowing whether a place is wheelchair accessible or the hours of operation for a nearby clinic.) There are many reasons why Local Guides contribute, but whether you love to review vegetarian restaurants or add missing info, you can make a huge impact on a global scale. By sharing your knowledge on Google Maps, you’re telling your story and having it seen by people all around the world. Being a Local Guide could also lead to being featured in a Local Guides video or getting an invitation to Google-hosted Local Guides events like last year’s Summit or this year’s Connect Live. If you have a story you want to tell on camera, tell us about it using this casting form. In addition to helping others, connecting with like-minded Local Guides, and getting your stories told, your contributions could also get you perks. As a special surprise, perks may be offered from time to time to say “thanks!” for being a Local Guide. Recent perks include a digital subscription to The New York Times, free movie tickets from Atom, and discounted redBus tickets. Didn’t get a perk? The Local Guides program is constantly evolving, and so are perks. We are always looking to offer more perks to more Local Guides, so be sure your email preferences have perks emails enabled by visiting your Local Guides home. If you have a suggested partner, or a perk you would like to see offered in your area,
Adam Tuiletufuga (14 months ago)
The Capitol Building is beautiful in form and representation. Removed from the politics of it all, the building has come to represent a democratic society and does so with a level of grandeur not often seen in American architecture. The amount of detail in this building is amazing and the short, but sweet, tour they regularly 6 days a week is highly informative. My favorite room is the Rotunda, which features 8 massive and important paintings that many Americans will have seen in their textbooks during school, such the painting of President Washington's surrendering of power when he left the office (the first peaceful handing over of power). This location is a MUST-SEE when visiting Washington, both the outside of the building and the tour inside.
Paola Cruz (14 months ago)
It was very interesting to be in a place with so much history. If you are a history buff, specifically American history, then it is definitely worth going on the tour. There is so much to learn and every room you walk into is beautiful and detailed. Also, our tour guide was very friendly and took the time to answer everyone’s questions. If you want to do more than the tour and explore everything the Capitol has to offer, it would definitely take about a half day.
Kevin P (14 months ago)
The experience of touring this place is incredible. You get to see such cool rooms and art. I learned a lot on the tour, and wish I had booked through my representative so I could've gotten a gallery pass, but that means I'll have to come back and do it next time!
Erik Mannery (15 months ago)
Beautiful building - don't forget to look up a lot, there is also something new that you will see! The Senate and House chambers were a little surreal to see and the House had a vote going which was fun to sit in on. It was great to get to visit a huge part in the history of democracy.
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Klis Fortress

From its origin as a small stronghold built by the ancient Illyrian tribe Dalmatae, becoming a royal castle that was the seat of many Croatian kings, to its final development as a large fortress during the Ottoman wars in Europe, Klis Fortress has guarded the frontier, being lost and re-conquered several times. Due to its location on a pass that separates the mountains Mosor and Kozjak, the fortress served as a major source of defense in Dalmatia, especially against the Ottoman advance, and has been a key crossroad between the Mediterranean belt and the Balkan rear.

Since Duke Mislav of the Duchy of Croatia made Klis Fortress the seat of his throne in the middle of the 9th century, the fortress served as the seat of many Croatia"s rulers. The reign of his successor, Duke Trpimir I, the founder of the Croatian royal House of Trpimirović, is significant for spreading Christianity in the Duchy of Croatia. He largely expanded the Klis Fortress, and in Rižinice, in the valley under the fortress, he built a church and the first Benedictine monastery in Croatia. During the reign of the first Croatian king, Tomislav, Klis and Biograd na Moru were his chief residences.

In March 1242 at Klis Fortress, Tatars who were a constituent segment of the Mongol army under the leadership of Kadan suffered a major defeat while in pursuit of the Hungarian army led by King Béla IV. After their defeat by Croatian forces, the Mongols retreated, and Béla IV rewarded many Croatian towns and nobles with 'substantial riches'. During the Late Middle Ages, the fortress was governed by Croatian nobility, amongst whom Paul I Šubić of Bribir was the most significant. During his reign, the House of Šubić controlled most of modern-day Croatia and Bosnia. Excluding the brief possession by the forces of Bosnian King, Tvrtko I, the fortress remained in Hungaro-Croatian hands for the next several hundred years, until the 16th century.

Klis Fortress is probably best known for its defense against the Ottoman invasion of Europe in the early 16th century. Croatian captain Petar Kružić led the defense of the fortress against a Turkish invasion and siege that lasted for more than two and a half decades. During this defense, as Kružić and his soldiers fought without allies against the Turks, the military faction of Uskoks was formed, which later became famous as an elite Croatian militant sect. Ultimately, the defenders were defeated and the fortress was occupied by the Ottomans in 1537. After more than a century under Ottoman rule, in 1669, Klis Fortress was besieged and seized by the Republic of Venice, thus moving the border between Christian and Muslim Europe further east and helping to contribute to the decline of the Ottoman Empire. The Venetians restored and enlarged the fortress, but it was taken by the Austrians after Napoleon extinguished the republic itself in 1797. Today, Klis Fortress contains a museum where visitors to this historic military structure can see an array of arms, armor, and traditional uniforms.