Smithsonian American Art Museum

Washington, D.C., United States

The Smithsonian American Art Museum has one of the world's largest and most inclusive collections of art, from the colonial period to the present, made in the United States. The museum has more than 7,000 artists represented in the collection, which contains the largest collection of New Deal art; a collection of contemporary craft, American impressionist paintings, and masterpieces from the Gilded Age; photography, modern folk art, works by African American and Latino artists, images of western expansion, and realist art from the first half of the twentieth century. Most exhibitions take place in the museum's main building, the old Patent Office Building (shared with the National Portrait Gallery), while craft-focused exhibitions are shown in the museum's Renwick Gallery.

The main building, the Old Patent Office Building, is a National Historic Landmark and is considered an example of Greek Revival architecture in the United States. It was designed by architects Robert Mills and Thomas U. Walter.

Part of the Smithsonian Institution, the museum has a broad variety of American art, with more than 7,000 artists represented, that covers all regions and art movements found in the United States. Among the significant artists represented in its collection are Nam June Paik, Jenny Holzer, David Hockney, Georgia O'Keeffe, John Singer Sargent, Albert Pinkham Ryder, Albert Bierstadt, Edmonia Lewis, Thomas Moran, James Gill, Edward Hopper, John William 'Uncle Jack' Dey, Karen LaMonte and Winslow Homer.

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Details

Founded: 1829
Category: Museums in United States

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christy A (2 years ago)
A MUST SEE! The work inside the Smithsonian is not only jaw dropping it's educational & fun for all ages. Within walking distance to the train hit the museum for a half day to explore the greatness of American Presidents, hip hop legends, photographers, artifacts and much more. Guides, guards and paper maps are available throughout.
Jae Robinson (2 years ago)
What a fantastic DC treasure! Enjoyed the exhibits and then spent time in the auditorium listen to Astronaut Scott Kelly share his experiences in space! We couldn't see it all in one visit .. plan two days!
Joel Carlson (2 years ago)
Such a blast, so much to see and do. You're gonna have to spend several hours just to see it all. All the curators are wonderful, happy to explain pieces or give directions. I liked it so much I went twice in one week!
Marguerite King (2 years ago)
Beautiful and informative! Go early or make 2 days event. Food was very good and gift shop was at the right place on the way out! Loved it!
Mandi Fowler (2 years ago)
Exceptional experience as the museums themselves have went to great lengths to provide educated information, curators and staff. The architecture of the Smithsonian museums, alone are phenomenal to see and a great compliment to the contents housed inside. Children and people traveling from other countries who otherwise do not know better, should however be reminded that touching artwork is a "no no" and should view from no closer than 12 inches away.
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