Korean War Veterans Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The Korean War Veterans Memorial commemorates those who served in the Korean War. It was confirmed by the U.S. Congress in 1986.

The main memorial is in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. The Mural was created by Louis Nelson, with photographic images sandblasted into it depicting soldiers, equipment and people involved in the war. When reflected on the wall, there appear to be 38 soldiers, 38 months, and it is also representing the 38 parallel that separated the North and South Korea.

Within the walled triangle are 19 stainless steel statues designed by Frank Gaylord. The figures represent a squad on patrol, drawn from each branch of the armed forces; fourteen of the figures are from the U.S. Army, three are from the Marine Corps, one is a Navy Corpsman, and one is an Air Force Forward Air Observer. They are dressed in full combat gear, dispersed among strips of granite and juniper bushes which represent the rugged terrain of Korea.

To the north of the statues and path is the United Nations Wall, a low wall listing the 22 members of the United Nations that contributed troops or medical support to the Korean War effort.

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Founded: 1986
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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sterling Biggs (19 months ago)
We came here at night. Our tour guide brought us here. Very nice. All of the soldiers appeared to be looking at you while you walked pass them. It was neat to see the engravings into the granite wall behind them. Next time we come here, we'll try and come during the day to see the difference.
Kevin Whitson (20 months ago)
This was very emotional to come upon. I hadn't remembered seeing anything about this memorial. The carvings of the men on patrol seemed to come alive. You believed the fear on their faces. I think it touched me more deeply than any of the other monuments, and that surprises me.
Shanel de Groot (20 months ago)
The details in this memorial are remarkable. Their emotion and stance is so lifelike you feel as if you were there experiencing it with them. The wall built beside them is also phenomenal to see. The details and layout is just stunning. A must see
Michael Cruz (21 months ago)
One of the better memorial monuments. Go at night/dusk if you can, seeing the soldier statues in that light is dramatic. Reflecting on it later it was something I valued from our trip recently and what I end up talking about with friends.
Gee (21 months ago)
One of the most memorable memorials. Well placed life-like sculptures. Very captivating. Interesting to visit any season for a different perspective. Each provides a unique insight into these seemingly animated men. Each contains a unique story.
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