Freer and Sackler Galleries

Washington, D.C., United States

The Freer and Sackler galleries house the largest Asian art research library in the country and contain art from East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Islamic world, the ancient Near East, and ancient Egypt, as well as a significant collection of American art.

The gallery is located on the south side of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., adjacent to the physically connected Sackler Gallery. The galleries are among the most visited art museums in the world.

The Freer houses over 26,000 objects spanning 6,000 years of history from the Neolithic to modern eras. The collections include ancient Egyptian stone sculpture and wooden objects, ancient Near Eastern ceramics and metalware, Chinese paintings and ceramics, Korean pottery and porcelain, Japanese folding screens, Persian manuscripts, and Buddhist sculpture. In addition to Asian art, the Freer also contains the famous Peacock Room by American artist James McNeill Whistler which serves as the centerpiece to the Freer's American art collection.

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Details

Founded: 1923
Category: Museums in United States

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ahmed Saeed (2 years ago)
The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery is an art museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. focusing on Asian art. The Sackler Gallery and the Freer Gallery of Art together form the Smithsonian's national museums of Asian art in the United States. The Freer and Sackler galleries house the largest Asian art research library in the country. Founded in 1982, the Gallery is named after Arthur M. Sackler, who donated approximately 1,000 objects and $4 million to the building of the museum. Located on the south side of the National Mall, and being physically connected to the Freer Gallery of Art, 96% of the museum is located underground below the Enid A. Haupt Garden. Their donations and contributions have been protested by people who accuse them of being a key contributor to the opioid crisis in the U.S.
Ahmed Saeed (2 years ago)
The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery is an art museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. focusing on Asian art. The Sackler Gallery and the Freer Gallery of Art together form the Smithsonian's national museums of Asian art in the United States. The Freer and Sackler galleries house the largest Asian art research library in the country. Founded in 1982, the Gallery is named after Arthur M. Sackler, who donated approximately 1,000 objects and $4 million to the building of the museum. Located on the south side of the National Mall, and being physically connected to the Freer Gallery of Art, 96% of the museum is located underground below the Enid A. Haupt Garden. Their donations and contributions have been protested by people who accuse them of being a key contributor to the opioid crisis in the U.S.
Jeffrey Myers (2 years ago)
Absolutely first-rate collection. The current Hokusai exhibition is drawn entirely from the museum's own collection!
Jeffrey Myers (2 years ago)
Absolutely first-rate collection. The current Hokusai exhibition is drawn entirely from the museum's own collection!
Joice Tjen (3 years ago)
At first I didn't want to visit this museum because we're from Asia, why would we wanna see more Asian artifacts. But since we were at the Smithsonian Castle, we decided to give it a try. How I was wrong. The entrance has made a different first impression! With an interesting monkey display and the most friendly guard we've ever met who explained to us the story behind the display, we came in with curiosity. The museum was not crowded, it has a few free big lockers where we can keep our bahg and coat, and water coolers are everywhere. At one level, the building is connected to the Freer museum so I can't really remember which room belongs to which museum. But overall, the Sackler and Freer museums are a must visit!
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