The National Museum of American History

Washington, D.C., United States

The National Museum of American History opened in 1964. In 1980, the museum was renamed the National Museum of American History to represent its mission of the collection, care, study, and interpretation of objects that reflect the experience of the American people. The museum is part of the Smithsonian Institution and located on the National Mall.

Each wing of the museum's three exhibition floors is anchored by a landmark object to highlight the theme of that wing. These include the John Bull locomotive, the Greensboro, North Carolina lunch counter, and a one of a kind draft wheel. Landmarks from pre-existing exhibits include the 1865 Vassar Telescope, a George Washington Statue, a Red Cross ambulance, and a car from Disneyland's Dumbo Flying Elephant ride.

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Founded: 1964
Category: Museums in United States

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brianna Berry (17 months ago)
This is one of the favorite museums at the Smithsonian! The American History museum has so many icons of history and pop culture that you read about in textbooks and see in movies. With the number of exhibits they have, you could spend all day here and there is something for everyone! It is super kid friendly and very interactive. If you have to make a choice between which Smithsonian museums to visit, this one should be at the top of the list.
Kayla Olson (17 months ago)
Free to the public. This is one of the museums with the metal detectors. Have all bags out and ready to open, even wallets. Make sure all metal is out of your pockets. It goes by fast if everyone is prepared
Coley Smith (17 months ago)
Wonderful experience! We went on a weekend so it was crowded as usual, but the exhibits are being improved and added to all the time. We never visit the cafes or anything, as they are museum and just generally overpriced but that’s normal. The Americans at War exhibit is my favorite by far, and is definitely worth the trip in itself. It has tons for everyone to enjoy and covers a huge range of topics and artifacts for a family to enjoy. I’ll visit again!!!
Mohanadarshan Vivekanandalingam (17 months ago)
I loved this place. You will get to know many things about the American history at the end of the visit. Get ready to spend at least few hours in this place. It was a pleasant visit for us. The staff is very friendly. They do have washroom facility in all the floors. One of the must visit in Washington DC; you will really like it.
Krista Hanson (17 months ago)
It's a real mixed bag. The Star Spangled Banner flag is breathtaking. Additionally, one exhibit with the history of voting rights was particularly well curated, so much so I'm inclined to teach my students using it. On the other hand, the first lady exhibit is shameful. It's just a collection of dresses. Almost no mention at all of the political platforms developed by first ladies throughout history.
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