The Supreme Court Building is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States. Completed in 1935, it is situated in Washington, immediately east of the United States Capitol. The building is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol. The Supreme Court Building is built in the Neoclassical style. The public façade is made of marble quarried from Vermont, and that of the non-public-facing courtyards, Georgia marble. Most of the interior spaces are lined with Alabama marble, except for the Courtroom itself, which is lined with Spanish ivory vein marble.

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Founded: 1935
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in United States

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Martin (10 months ago)
It's nice to be able to see where the action happens. Be sure to check their website if you are planning to visit as a tourist because the building can be closed. I would have liked to see the cantilevered marble staircases inside.
Mad Mike0082 (11 months ago)
Just love this city and it never gets old seeing all these amazing historical sites.
Bob Rees,Jr (13 months ago)
If you emulate Iowa.. I have lost all faith in America.
Tim Austin (2 years ago)
Fortunate to have visited this history location on a school trip in 2002. I would say this is well worth a visit if you are in the area!
Kai C (2 years ago)
Make sure you join the free lecture given inside the building. The volunteer will take you into this highest court of the Land and give a 30 minute long introduction of the court's history. It is an amazing experience!??????????
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Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.