Podsreda Castle dates to around 1150 and is probably the best-preserved example of secular Romanesque architecture in Slovenia. It features a typical 12th-century defensive tower (keep), a Romanesque chapel, and two wings from about the same period. The orderly, rectangular plan is also typical of the late Romanesque period.

Over the years the castle has seen many owners. Though neglected after the Second World War, the castle has since undergone extensive renovation work, starting in 1983. During the renovation numerous forgotten and neglected features where rediscovered, among them some Romanesque double windows, the chiselled frames of windows and doors and the remains of paintings. It is open during the summer months and a popular setting for weddings.

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Founded: c. 1150
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomislav černak (2 years ago)
Lep grad vreden ogleda
Barbara Bezjak (3 years ago)
Zelo lepo urejeno z natačnimi navodili z avdio vodnikom. Popelje te nazaj v čas graščakov. Opisi so zanimivi za vse generacije. Vredno ogleda.
Vivian Woodell (3 years ago)
Somewhat inauthentic restoration but nevertheless a spectacular location
Tomaž Menič (3 years ago)
One of the most picturesque castles in Slovenia with great views of the surrounding villages and hills.
pingvin128 (5 years ago)
Smaller castle but filed with art and history. Closed on Mondays. Nice echo room. Good start for several hikes.
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