Alexander Church

Narva, Estonia

Narva Alexander's Cathedral is the biggest church in Estonia. The project of the church was drawn by Otto Pius von Hippius and it was built between 1881 – 1884. The plot of land for the church was a gift from Georg v. Kramer, the owner of Joala mansion. The owner of the Krenholm Manufacture paid the building expenses and the church was built to accommodate 5000 workers of Krenholm Manufacture and had 2500 seats.

Church was built in Romanesque style. The height of the main building is 25,5 m and the belfry in the western part of the church was 60,75 m high. The organ with 30 stops was built in Walcker factory in Germany.

On the 6th of March 1944 the soviet army bombed Narva, damaging the roof of the church. On the 24th of July on 1944 the tower was destroyed, allegedly by the leaving German army.

The divine services were held in this church until 1962, when the soviet authorities forced the congregation to leave The church was converted into a storehouse. In 1990 the Cathdral was returned to the congregation and now the restoration works are lead by Villu Jürjo, the present minister of the church.

Reference: Narvakirik.ee

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Address

Kiriku 9, Narva, Estonia
See all sites in Narva

Details

Founded: 1881-1884
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jurate Baltus (3 years ago)
Historic.
Vladimir Leonov (3 years ago)
Отличное место! За три евро Вас поднимут на лифте на башню, а экскурсоводом будет священник Владимир! Отличная экскурсия-проповедь! ;) В самом храме неповторимая атмосфера с удобными креслами. Следите за расписанием, и быть может Вы попадете на трансляцию инсталляции под куполом!
Maie Oppar (3 years ago)
Äge
Maija Joutsi (3 years ago)
Прекрасный собор, которому необходимо финансирования для окончательного окончания строительных работ по восстановлению.
Alberto Lazzerini (6 years ago)
Very nice
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