Hermann Castle

Narva, Estonia

Hermann Castle (also Hermannsburg, Herman Castle, Narva Castle, or Narva fortress) was founded in 1256 by the Danes and the first stone castle was built in the beginning of the 14th century. The German Livonian Teutonic knights order purchased the castle on 29 August 1346 and for most of its history the castle was German Teutonic.

Although the exact age of Narva Castle and the town cause still arguments between historians, they agree on the sequence of events. Firstly, in about the 13th century, the Danes, who had conquered Northern Estonia, built a wooden border stronghold at the crossing of the Narova River and the old road. Under the protection of the stronghold, the earlier settlement developed into the town of Narva, which obtained the Lubeck town rights in the first half of the 14th century.

Following several conflicts with the Russians, the Danes started building a stone stronghold at the beginning of the 14th century. It was a small castellum-like building with 40-metre sides and a tower, a predecessor of the today's Herman Tower, at its north-western corner. At the beginning of the 14th century, a small forecourt was established at the north side of the stronghold and, in the middle of the century, a large forecourt was added to the west side, where citizens were allowed to hide in case of wars as the town of Narva was not surrounded by a wall during the Danish rule.

In 1347 the Danish king sold Northern Estonia, including Narva, to the Livonian Order, who rebuilt the building into a convent building according to their needs. The stronghold has for the most part preserved the ground plan with its massive wings and a courtyard in the middle. The Herman Tower was also completed at the time of the Order, necessitated by the establishment of Ivangorod Castle by the Russians to the opposite side of the Narva River in 1492. The Order surrounded the town with a wall, which unfortunately has not been preserved (in 1777 there came an order to pull it down).

The Narva Castle is one of the main attractions of the city. The Narva Castle is the most diverse and best preserved defence structure in Estonia. The area of the castle is 3.2 hectares, and the highest point is the Tall Hermann Tower (51 metres). Today you can visit the museum in the castle, were the displays explain the history of Narva and the castle. There are handicraft workshops in the northern courtyard, where you can try your hand at various techniques and handicrafts.

Reference: Wikipedia, Visit Estonia

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Address

Linnuse, Narva, Estonia
See all sites in Narva

Details

Founded: 1256
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Randar Narme (12 months ago)
Simply a must-go in Narva.
Cristina Barcos (2 years ago)
Interesting overall. They try to fill in the space as best they can. Lots of up and down. I liked the medieval feel of the courtyard and stalls. Surprisingly, I even liked the beer. The views make it worth your while.
Michael Peretochkin (2 years ago)
Unique architecture, museum and a good place to go for a walk or an excursion.
Artur Usk (2 years ago)
Very cheap and you can get a very good view at the city. Has a not-too-big selection of different arts and curios, spent there 2 hours, probably takes longer in the summer. A must-go when visiting Narva, no excuses.
Nick The Long Shanks (2 years ago)
You've got to appreciate how the local people are looking after this historical site. The building is quite stunning, with lots to explore, see and interact with. What they have done in the North Courtyard is really neat, with hands on things to do and fun craft stuff to look at and buy. Great for kids and adults, although be prepared for a lot of climbing. Most signs had an English translation although not everything did.
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