Narva Town Hall

Narva, Estonia

The town hall is one of the three buildings in Narva survived from World War II. The Baroque-style building was built by the order of Swedish king Charles XI. The project of the master George Teuffel from Lubeck formed the basis of the building, the construction of which started in 1688. After three years, at the latest in 1691, the building was finished when a gold-plated forged weathercock in the form of a crane was put at the top of the tower (it was made by master Grabben).

During the World War II, the Town Hall was severely damaged: the tower, the roof, the flooring were destroyed, the stairs and the figures at the portal got considerable damages. During the renovation works in the Town Hall (1956-1963), the tower was rebuilt, and the building attained the new roof; the facade and the portal were reconstructed, and the grate that connected stairs and handrails was restored.

Reference: Narva Museum

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Address

Rüütli 1, Narva, Estonia
See all sites in Narva

Details

Founded: 1688-1691
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yefim Shabarov (10 months ago)
Nice place!
Alexander Wagon (13 months ago)
This place has been neglected for many years and deserves restoration and investment in it.
Yerlan Akhmetov (15 months ago)
Must visit place in Narva along with the Castle!
Kristjan Variksoo (2 years ago)
The clock was completely wrong.
Kristjan Variksoo (2 years ago)
The clock was completely wrong.
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