Narva Town Hall

Narva, Estonia

The town hall is one of the three buildings in Narva survived from World War II. The Baroque-style building was built by the order of Swedish king Charles XI. The project of the master George Teuffel from Lubeck formed the basis of the building, the construction of which started in 1688. After three years, at the latest in 1691, the building was finished when a gold-plated forged weathercock in the form of a crane was put at the top of the tower (it was made by master Grabben).

During the World War II, the Town Hall was severely damaged: the tower, the roof, the flooring were destroyed, the stairs and the figures at the portal got considerable damages. During the renovation works in the Town Hall (1956-1963), the tower was rebuilt, and the building attained the new roof; the facade and the portal were reconstructed, and the grate that connected stairs and handrails was restored.

Reference: Narva Museum

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Address

Rüütli 1, Narva, Estonia
See all sites in Narva

Details

Founded: 1688-1691
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Natali Belinska (2 years ago)
One of the few well survived old building in Narva
Heiki Tomann (2 years ago)
Holds surprising small-scaled model of Narva inside
Victoria Godbold (2 years ago)
Old historical town hall at Narva which is very close to the Russian border. There is also a viewpoint nearby where you can see the 2 castles, the one on the Russian side and the one on the Estonian side which are separated by a river.
Jackob Wells (3 years ago)
Interesting place but... It is too old and building needs restoration. Inside is Royal giraffe art residence with changing exhibitions.
Liliia Abdulina (3 years ago)
Interesting from a historical point of view. Keeps the spirit of past inside. It has enormous paper model of Narva with all its buildings. Those paper models are the main thing here, in Town Hall, so you wouldn’t have to spent much time here :) Then you can proceed to the cafe in a nearby building.
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