Vasknarva Castle Ruins

Ida-Virumaa, Estonia

The first Vasknarva order castle (Neuschloss) was founded in 1349 on the northeastern border of Old Livonia. 1427–1442 a new castle (Vastne-Narva) was built, which became the centre of the vogtei of the Livonian Order. The castle was wracked in the Livonian War. Until the Great Northern War it was a fort of great importance, commanding the mouth of the Narva River. It has been known in Russian chronicles either as Syrensk or Syrenets. According the folklore St. Olga of Pskov narrowly escaped drowning when crossing the Narva rapids at Syrenets. Nowadays only parts of 3 meters thin walls have survived, mainly on the northern side.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1349
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vladimir Kirpichnikov (17 months ago)
A place with a nice view to Russia. The ruins were a bit small
Hiido Farang (17 months ago)
Peaceful place
Arvi Lepp (2 years ago)
Nice place. Next to river. Good views. Can see Russia from here...
Philip Johnston (3 years ago)
Ruins and an information board. Great view of a large Russian flag.
Jaak Kõusaar (4 years ago)
Nice view to Estonian-Russian border
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