Orthodox Resurrection of the Christ Cathedral

Narva, Estonia

The Orthodox cathedral was built in 1890-1898 by the Kreenholm manufacture for its Orthodox labour. It was designed by architect Pavel Alisch. The great cathedral is made of brick and Finnish granite and has seats for 2000 people.

The most prominent feature of its interior is the wooden crucifix (Architect Astafjev). The icons were painted by Michail Dickarev (Palech School).

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Address

Linda 24-34, Narva, Estonia
See all sites in Narva

Details

Founded: 1890-1898
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

tourism.narva.ee

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Randar Narme (7 months ago)
A must-see place in Narva.
Xmootor (8 months ago)
Ise pead kohal käima siis saad aru
Наталья Гудкова (9 months ago)
Большой, красивый храм, расположенный среди современной застройки. Силуэт выглядит довольно необычно, а еще из-за хорошего состояния кажется, что здание современной постройки. С удивлением узнала, что даты постройки 1890—1896. Есть элементы, которые не характерны для православия - например статуя Христа. По преданию, во время уничтожения всего лютеранского в нарвской церкви после победы над шведами, Петр I обратил внимание на этот крест и сказал: «Распятию быть!».
George On tour (11 months ago)
The festive ceremony of the cornerstone of the Church of the Ascension of Christ was held on August 5, 1890, and the cornerstone was consecrated by the bishop Arseni (Brjantsev) of Riga and Miitavi in ​​the presence of Emperor Alexander III and Emperor Maria Fjodorovna. Alexander III placed the cornerstone personally. The design of the Byzantine church that reminded the Greco-Greek was the architect of the plan, architect Pavel Ališ, who worked in the Kreenholm Manufaktur from 1888-1907. The main building material is the red and yellow bricks made at the Kulga factory belonging to the Kreenholm manufactory. The foundation, stairs and decorations were made of Finnish granite. Afanasyev was the author of three-threaded carved carved and overstocked iconostasis, but the icons were written at the Dikarijov Workshop at Moscow Icon Museum. In 1912, the paintings of the dwarf drum, the croutons and the main daisies were completed. The painting "The Lord of the World" is best preserved in these paintings, the rest is still worse, but the painting of the eastern daisies has been destroyed altogether. The lobes are the traditional images of the apostles and evangelists Matteus, Markus, Luke and John. On November 17, 1896, the main head of the Ascension of Christ was celebrated in the presence of Arseni, Archbishop of Riga and Militaire, in the presence of the Governor of Estonia, J. Skalon. The north altar of all the saints was consecrated on June 1, 1897. In the middle of the mid-20th century, this altar was consecrated after the repair of the holy Emperor Nikolaos. Among the icons of the sanctuary, the iconic icon of the holy Nicolaos and the "Devil's Name" icon of the Godhead could be highlighted. Attention is also drawn to the large, late-Gothic cruciform form, made by the late 17th-century master Elert Thiele, for the Church of St George in Jerusalem, located on the left. The form of the cross was in the Chronicle of the Transfiguration of the Lord and lived happily over the 1944 bombing attack. After the Second World War, the Resurrection Church was blown away in Narva, the only healed sanctuary, and on January 20, 1958, it was renamed the main hero. On the 100th anniversary, the church was thoroughly renovated. The lower church, which was consecrated to Serafim, was also remodeled to Saarov's wagon, which had the first post-war Laid Service in 1945. On November 16, 1996, the Lower Church was ordained by the Bishop according to the order of Tallinn and the whole Estonian Archbishop of Kornelius.
David Iwanow (2 years ago)
What a wonderful building, worth a visit for sure if you are in Narva even if you aren't religious.
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