Orthodox Resurrection of the Christ Cathedral

Narva, Estonia

The Orthodox cathedral was built in 1890-1898 by the Kreenholm manufacture for its Orthodox labour. It was designed by architect Pavel Alisch. The great cathedral is made of brick and Finnish granite and has seats for 2000 people.

The most prominent feature of its interior is the wooden crucifix (Architect Astafjev). The icons were painted by Michail Dickarev (Palech School).

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Address

Linda 24-34, Narva, Estonia
See all sites in Narva

Details

Founded: 1890-1898
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

tourism.narva.ee

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Randar Narme (4 months ago)
A must-see place in Narva.
Xmootor (5 months ago)
Ise pead kohal käima siis saad aru
Наталья Гудкова (6 months ago)
Большой, красивый храм, расположенный среди современной застройки. Силуэт выглядит довольно необычно, а еще из-за хорошего состояния кажется, что здание современной постройки. С удивлением узнала, что даты постройки 1890—1896. Есть элементы, которые не характерны для православия - например статуя Христа. По преданию, во время уничтожения всего лютеранского в нарвской церкви после победы над шведами, Петр I обратил внимание на этот крест и сказал: «Распятию быть!».
George On tour (8 months ago)
The festive ceremony of the cornerstone of the Church of the Ascension of Christ was held on August 5, 1890, and the cornerstone was consecrated by the bishop Arseni (Brjantsev) of Riga and Miitavi in ​​the presence of Emperor Alexander III and Emperor Maria Fjodorovna. Alexander III placed the cornerstone personally. The design of the Byzantine church that reminded the Greco-Greek was the architect of the plan, architect Pavel Ališ, who worked in the Kreenholm Manufaktur from 1888-1907. The main building material is the red and yellow bricks made at the Kulga factory belonging to the Kreenholm manufactory. The foundation, stairs and decorations were made of Finnish granite. Afanasyev was the author of three-threaded carved carved and overstocked iconostasis, but the icons were written at the Dikarijov Workshop at Moscow Icon Museum. In 1912, the paintings of the dwarf drum, the croutons and the main daisies were completed. The painting "The Lord of the World" is best preserved in these paintings, the rest is still worse, but the painting of the eastern daisies has been destroyed altogether. The lobes are the traditional images of the apostles and evangelists Matteus, Markus, Luke and John. On November 17, 1896, the main head of the Ascension of Christ was celebrated in the presence of Arseni, Archbishop of Riga and Militaire, in the presence of the Governor of Estonia, J. Skalon. The north altar of all the saints was consecrated on June 1, 1897. In the middle of the mid-20th century, this altar was consecrated after the repair of the holy Emperor Nikolaos. Among the icons of the sanctuary, the iconic icon of the holy Nicolaos and the "Devil's Name" icon of the Godhead could be highlighted. Attention is also drawn to the large, late-Gothic cruciform form, made by the late 17th-century master Elert Thiele, for the Church of St George in Jerusalem, located on the left. The form of the cross was in the Chronicle of the Transfiguration of the Lord and lived happily over the 1944 bombing attack. After the Second World War, the Resurrection Church was blown away in Narva, the only healed sanctuary, and on January 20, 1958, it was renamed the main hero. On the 100th anniversary, the church was thoroughly renovated. The lower church, which was consecrated to Serafim, was also remodeled to Saarov's wagon, which had the first post-war Laid Service in 1945. On November 16, 1996, the Lower Church was ordained by the Bishop according to the order of Tallinn and the whole Estonian Archbishop of Kornelius.
David Iwanow (2 years ago)
What a wonderful building, worth a visit for sure if you are in Narva even if you aren't religious.
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Porta Nigra

The Porta Nigra (Latin for black gate) is the largest Roman city gate north of the Alps. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site. The name Porta Nigra originated in the Middle Ages due to the darkened colour of its stone; the original Roman name has not been preserved. Locals commonly refer to the Porta Nigra simply as Porta.

The Porta Nigra was built in grey sandstone between 186 and 200 AD. The original gate consisted of two four-storied towers, projecting as near semicircles on the outer side. A narrow courtyard separated the two gate openings on either side. For unknown reasons, however, the construction of the gate remained unfinished. For example, the stones at the northern (outer) side of the gate were never abraded, and the protruding stones would have made it impossible to install movable gates. Nonetheless, the gate was used for several centuries until the end of the Roman era in Trier.

In Roman times, the Porta Nigra was part of a system of four city gates, one of which stood at each side of the roughly rectangular Roman city. The Porta Nigra guarded the northern entry to the Roman city, while the Porta Alba (White Gate) was built in the east, the Porta Media (Middle Gate) in the south, and the Porta Inclyta (Famous Gate) in the west, next to the Roman bridge across the Moselle. The gates stood at the ends of the two main streets of the Roman Trier, one of which led north-south and the other east-west. Of these gates, only the Porta Nigra still exists today.

In the early Middle Ages the Roman city gates were no longer used for their original function and their stones were taken and reused for other buildings. Also iron and lead braces were broken out of the walls of the Porta Nigra for reuse. Traces of this destruction are still clearly visible on the north side of the gate.

After 1028, the Greek monk Simeon lived as a hermit in the ruins of the Porta Nigra. After his death (1035) and sanctification, the Simeonstift monastery was built next to the Porta Nigra to honor him. Saving it from further destruction, the Porta Nigra was transformed into a church: The inner court of the gate was roofed and intermediate ceilings were inserted. The two middle storeys of the former gate were converted into church naves: the upper storey being for the monks and the lower storey for the general public. The ground floor with the large gates was sealed, and a large outside staircase was constructed alongside the south side (the town side) of the gate, up to the lower storey of the church. A small staircase led further up to the upper storey. The church rooms were accessible through former windows of the western tower of the Porta Nigra that were enlarged to become entrance doors (still visible today). The top floor of the western tower was used as church tower, the eastern tower was leveled, and an apse added at its east side. An additional gate - the much smaller Simeon Gate - was built adjacent to the East side of the Porta Nigra and served as a city gate in medieval times.

In 1802 Napoleon Bonaparte dissolved the church in the Porta Nigra and the monastery beside it, along with the vast majority of Trier"s numerous churches and monasteries. On his visit to Trier in 1804, Napoleon ordered that the Porta Nigra be converted back to its Roman form. Only the apse was kept; but the eastern tower was not rebuilt to its original height. Local legend has it that Napoleon originally wanted to completely tear down the church, but locals convinced him that the church had actually been a Gaulish festival hall before being turned into a church. Another version of the story is that they told him about its Roman origins, persuading him to convert the gate back to its original form.

In 1986 the Porta Nigra was designated a World Heritage Site, along with other Roman monuments in Trier and its surroundings. The modern appearance of the Porta Nigra goes back almost unchanged to the reconstruction ordered by Napoleon. At the south side of the Porta Nigra, remains of Roman columns line the last 100 m of the street leading to the gate. Positioned where they had stood in Roman times, they give a slight impression of the aspect of the original Roman street that was lined with colonnades. The Porta Nigra, including the upper floors, is open to visitors.