The Church of Our Lady

Munich, Germany

The Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche) is undoubtedly the most famous landmark in the city of Munich. Its impressive domed twin towers rising a hundred metres into the sky can be seen from miles around. This triple-naved late-Gothic cathedral in Munich"s old quarter, which houses art treasures spanning five centuries, is the cathedral church of the Archbishop of Munich and Freising.

The late-Gothic brick edifice with its colossal saddleback roof, erected by Jörg von Hasbach between 1468 and 1488, towers over the other buildings in Munich"s old quarter. The Church of Our Lady is one of the largest hall churches in southern Germany. Despite its dimensions, it is the beauty and simplicity of the church which captivate its visitors. Inside there are many precious art treasures, such as the choir windows from the late 14th century which originate from the previous church, the figures of the apostles and prophets by Erasmus Grasser, and 18th century gilded reliefs by Ignaz Günther depicting scenes from the life of the Virgin Mary. The oldest tombs of the House of Wittelsbach are found in the royal vault under the choir, among them Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian and his sons.

The altars and the side altars, remodelled in the baroque style, are especially beautiful, as are the chapels which contain works by various artists, including van Dyck"s Christ on the Cross. Legend has it that the devil demanded the church be built without windows. When he went inside to inspect the building, he left behind a footprint in the entrance to the church. Thanks to an architectural illusion, no windows can be seen from the 'devil"s footprint' just inside the door, and the devil left satisfied. The towers house a total of ten bells with beautiful chimes, which are rung at different times throughout the day and on special occasions. The bells are amongst the most valuable and historical in Germany.

The Church of Our Lady has seating for 4,000 people and is always well attended. The south tower is open to the public. From the top, which can be reached either on foot or by lift, there is a splendid view of the city and the nearby Alps.

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Address

Frauenplatz 7, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 1468-1488
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Killeen (9 months ago)
Fantastic place would like to go back again great story behind the foot print you may look it up
Ken Bass (10 months ago)
A spectacular, breathtaking and peaceful event-building-experience-moment in time! You can walk inside or around the perimeter and each step will bring calm to your inner being. The sheer staying power of this structure and basic messages of the architecture will deliver a message to you, no matter what beliefs you hold. A place to marvel at art, architecture and humanity!
Justin Hardesty (11 months ago)
Beautiful area with beautiful scenery and architecture. A great place to visit with friends or family and spend the day.
Barbara Gulten (11 months ago)
Serenity is the one word this sanctuary can be described with. It’s is quite simple not as ornate as other cathedrals in area.. and that’s what precisely makes it special. Perfect for quiet reflection, prayer or whatever meditation you practice. It is in a great central location in Munich so there is a lot around and nearby to see, eat, and enjoy. Exterior architecture is quite nice to watch. Easy transportation options nearby; taxis, subway, and yes they do have Uber too. We felt lucky to spend time seeing this cathedral and unplug from everything in peace and quit. Highly recommend it.
Natalie Garcia (13 months ago)
My husband and I walked to the top of the church to take a view from above and it was absolutely worth it. MANY flights of stairs but there are small and few "benches" to take a break on. Do not be intimidated on the initial set of stairs!
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