The Church of Our Lady

Munich, Germany

The Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche) is undoubtedly the most famous landmark in the city of Munich. Its impressive domed twin towers rising a hundred metres into the sky can be seen from miles around. This triple-naved late-Gothic cathedral in Munich"s old quarter, which houses art treasures spanning five centuries, is the cathedral church of the Archbishop of Munich and Freising.

The late-Gothic brick edifice with its colossal saddleback roof, erected by Jörg von Hasbach between 1468 and 1488, towers over the other buildings in Munich"s old quarter. The Church of Our Lady is one of the largest hall churches in southern Germany. Despite its dimensions, it is the beauty and simplicity of the church which captivate its visitors. Inside there are many precious art treasures, such as the choir windows from the late 14th century which originate from the previous church, the figures of the apostles and prophets by Erasmus Grasser, and 18th century gilded reliefs by Ignaz Günther depicting scenes from the life of the Virgin Mary. The oldest tombs of the House of Wittelsbach are found in the royal vault under the choir, among them Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian and his sons.

The altars and the side altars, remodelled in the baroque style, are especially beautiful, as are the chapels which contain works by various artists, including van Dyck"s Christ on the Cross. Legend has it that the devil demanded the church be built without windows. When he went inside to inspect the building, he left behind a footprint in the entrance to the church. Thanks to an architectural illusion, no windows can be seen from the 'devil"s footprint' just inside the door, and the devil left satisfied. The towers house a total of ten bells with beautiful chimes, which are rung at different times throughout the day and on special occasions. The bells are amongst the most valuable and historical in Germany.

The Church of Our Lady has seating for 4,000 people and is always well attended. The south tower is open to the public. From the top, which can be reached either on foot or by lift, there is a splendid view of the city and the nearby Alps.

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Address

Frauenplatz 7, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 1468-1488
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cristian Chereji (2 months ago)
We got here a wonderful spontaneous organ concert. Great.
Rebekka D. G. Hansen (2 months ago)
The size of this church is unreal! Biggest church in München. The church itself is no doubt a 5 star experience, but the surroundings are a bit depressive. Other buildings have been built way to close and its hard to get a good view of the entire church from a distance. Still worth a visit??
Tamás Major (3 months ago)
Iconic building, a must-see, a symbol of Munich, very interesting. You will also find great restaurants and cafes in the area, it is very good to take a big walk in the city center.
hanif amin (4 months ago)
A must-see in Munich for all tourists and visitors! A magnificent cathedral with impressive Gothic architecture located in the heart of the city, which is also the landmark of Munich. The two towers attract the attention of every visitor from a further distance.
Anastasia Tsoukala (10 months ago)
A must visit place in Munich. There is no entrance fee. This church is considered to be the "Eiffel Tower" of the city. It has also a secret chappel in the basement with the graves of popes and royals of Munich! Definitely atmospheric and historical!
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