Haus der Kunst

Munich, Germany

The Haus der Kunst is a non-collecting art museum constructed from 1933 to 1937 following plans of architect Paul Ludwig Troost as the Third Reich's first monumental structure of Nazi architecture and as Nazi propaganda. The museum was opened in 1937 as a showcase for what the Third Reich regarded as Germany's finest art. The inaugural exhibition was the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung ('Great German art exhibition'), which was intended as an edifying contrast to the condemned modern art on display in the concurrent Degenerate art exhibition.

On 15 and 16 October 1939, the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung inside the Haus der Deutschen Kunst was complemented by the monumental Tag der Deutschen Kunst celebration of '2,000 years of Germanic culture' where luxuriously draped floats (one of them carrying a 5 meter tall golden Nazi Reichsadler) and thousands of actors in historical costumes paraded down Prinzregentenstraße for hours in the presence of Adolf Hitler, Hermann Göring, Joseph Goebbels, Heinrich Himmler, Albert Speer, Robert Ley, Reinhard Heydrich, and many other high-ranking Nazis.

After the end of World War II, the museum building was first used by the American occupation forces as an officer's mess; in that time, the building came to be known as the 'P1', a shortening of its street address. The building's original purpose can still be seen in such guises as the swastika-motif mosaics in the ceiling panels of its front portico.

Beginning in 1946, the museum rooms, now partitioned into several smaller exhibition areas, started to be used as temporary exhibition space for trade shows and visiting art exhibitions. Some parts of the museum were also used to showcase works from those of Munich's art galleries that had been destroyed during the war. In 2002, the National Collection of Modern and Contemporary Arts moved into the Pinakothek der Moderne. Today, while housing no permanent art exhibition of its own, the museum is still used as a showcase venue for temporary exhibitions and traveling exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 1933-1937
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Nazi Germany (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomás Undurraga (18 months ago)
Loss of time and money, I went to see Raphaela Vogel's exhibition and I got very disappointed. The exposed art awakens no feelings. Ok, maybe just visiting the building is interesting by historical context, but I rather recommend other museums in this city, for example, the old art gallery (Alte Pinakothek) for € 1 on Sundays or the Pinakothek der Moderne if you prefer also learning something new.
Yin Chen (18 months ago)
The highlight of my trip was the exhibit in the morning air raid shelter in the basement (you have to go outside to get there), so definitely ask about it (if you aren't already told). There's also a chic cafe with great atmosphere and comfortable couches. If the weather is nice you can sit outside as well.
Costa Kat (19 months ago)
Nothing to see except for nice looking building outfit. Just two painters exhibition on all these great premises. Used to be a cultural education center, but no more.
TX ROBMAN (19 months ago)
Excellent museum with good exhibits. Beautiful building and full of rich history. Must see site.
Patrick Suhner (2 years ago)
Good museum, interesting temporary exhibitions. Young children can also be interested by contemporary and modern art displayed at this place. Affordable EUR 24.- family ticket (usual good combo in Germany). You can spend some time there. Only I wish there was more than two artists exhibited.
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