Haus der Kunst

Munich, Germany

The Haus der Kunst is a non-collecting art museum constructed from 1933 to 1937 following plans of architect Paul Ludwig Troost as the Third Reich's first monumental structure of Nazi architecture and as Nazi propaganda. The museum was opened in 1937 as a showcase for what the Third Reich regarded as Germany's finest art. The inaugural exhibition was the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung ('Great German art exhibition'), which was intended as an edifying contrast to the condemned modern art on display in the concurrent Degenerate art exhibition.

On 15 and 16 October 1939, the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung inside the Haus der Deutschen Kunst was complemented by the monumental Tag der Deutschen Kunst celebration of '2,000 years of Germanic culture' where luxuriously draped floats (one of them carrying a 5 meter tall golden Nazi Reichsadler) and thousands of actors in historical costumes paraded down Prinzregentenstraße for hours in the presence of Adolf Hitler, Hermann Göring, Joseph Goebbels, Heinrich Himmler, Albert Speer, Robert Ley, Reinhard Heydrich, and many other high-ranking Nazis.

After the end of World War II, the museum building was first used by the American occupation forces as an officer's mess; in that time, the building came to be known as the 'P1', a shortening of its street address. The building's original purpose can still be seen in such guises as the swastika-motif mosaics in the ceiling panels of its front portico.

Beginning in 1946, the museum rooms, now partitioned into several smaller exhibition areas, started to be used as temporary exhibition space for trade shows and visiting art exhibitions. Some parts of the museum were also used to showcase works from those of Munich's art galleries that had been destroyed during the war. In 2002, the National Collection of Modern and Contemporary Arts moved into the Pinakothek der Moderne. Today, while housing no permanent art exhibition of its own, the museum is still used as a showcase venue for temporary exhibitions and traveling exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 1933-1937
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Nazi Germany (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kinga Lovász (3 months ago)
Best coctail bar in Munich ? und professional waitresses
jorman bocaranda (3 months ago)
Really nice place, very good service and good cocktail. If you're passing to see surfers in the Eisbach you can also stop by Haus der Kunst to refresh yourself. They have a big terrace!
Sandra dVE (5 months ago)
The history of the building itself is interesting enough. Glad that now it is used for contemporary art exhibitions. I am impressed by the quality of the artists, the appropriate space, and the atmosphere. Attached a picture from one of Phyllida Barlow's pieces of art.
Samer Shoukry (12 months ago)
Must See Art Museum ...changing shows programs .. lovely bar on premises
Samer Shoukry (12 months ago)
Must See Art Museum ...changing shows programs .. lovely bar on premises
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