St. Peter's Church

Munich, Germany

St. Peter's Church is the oldest church in the Munich district. Before the foundation of Munich as a city in 1158, there had been a pre-Merovingian church on this site. 8th century monks lived around this church on a hill called Petersbergl. At the end of the 12th century a new church in the Bavarian Romanesque style was consecrated, and expanded in Gothic style shortly before the great fire in 1327, which destroyed the building. After its reconstruction the church was dedicated anew in 1368. In the early 17th century the 91 meter spire received its Renaissance steeple top and a new Baroque choir was added.

The interior is dominated by the high altar to which Erasmus Grasser contributed the figure of Saint Peter. Among other masterpieces of all periods are five Gothic paintings by Jan Polack and several altars by Ignaz Günther. The ceiling fresco by Johann Baptist Zimmermann (1753–1756) was re-created in 1999-2000.

The parish church of Saint Peter, whose 91 meters high tower is commonly known as Alter Peter - Old Peter - and which is emblematic of Munich, is the oldest recorded parish church in Munich and presumably the originating point for the whole city.

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Address

Rindermarkt 1, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Bartz (3 months ago)
The tower (EUR 5 per adult) offers great views of the city if you manage to climb up stairs for about 14 stories. The way down ends in a nice church which would be worth a visit even if not going up to the tower first.
Aakash Christ (7 months ago)
Now in Germany, traveling around places to see ?? St. Peter's Church is a beautiful church in central old town part of Munich with lots of shops and restaurants around.Besides the 14 stations of the Cross images, alongside them also presents the miraculous birth of Christ. Truly interesting and astounding. Definitely worth a visit or prayer in it.
Alessandra Moeckel (8 months ago)
This church is amazing, is extremely pretty, the vibe is really nice. Saint Munditia (Mundita) is a martyr and her relics are found in a side altar at St. Peter's Church. The word is that if a women is looking for a husband she can pray for her to find love.
Marsyita Mohtar (8 months ago)
Beautiful and spacious gothic church with lots of natural light. Worth go sit in and bask in the serene ambience.
Sara Orfali (12 months ago)
Normal church, even if it’s the oldest in Munich. Must see is the tower. For 5 euros and over 300 steps, you get a very nice view of Munich from above. Included are the iconic towers of the Frauenkirche.
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