St. Peter's Church

Munich, Germany

St. Peter's Church is the oldest church in the Munich district. Before the foundation of Munich as a city in 1158, there had been a pre-Merovingian church on this site. 8th century monks lived around this church on a hill called Petersbergl. At the end of the 12th century a new church in the Bavarian Romanesque style was consecrated, and expanded in Gothic style shortly before the great fire in 1327, which destroyed the building. After its reconstruction the church was dedicated anew in 1368. In the early 17th century the 91 meter spire received its Renaissance steeple top and a new Baroque choir was added.

The interior is dominated by the high altar to which Erasmus Grasser contributed the figure of Saint Peter. Among other masterpieces of all periods are five Gothic paintings by Jan Polack and several altars by Ignaz Günther. The ceiling fresco by Johann Baptist Zimmermann (1753–1756) was re-created in 1999-2000.

The parish church of Saint Peter, whose 91 meters high tower is commonly known as Alter Peter - Old Peter - and which is emblematic of Munich, is the oldest recorded parish church in Munich and presumably the originating point for the whole city.

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Address

Rindermarkt 1, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tracy Sung (9 months ago)
Beautiful views from the tower. The inside is also very refreshing and light compared to other European churches. The panoramic view of Munich is beautiful with the red roofs and towers scattered throughout. Well worth a visit! Note: Visited prior to COVID; things may have changed.
Sami Sami (11 months ago)
St. Peter Church is just amazing. The building from outside is just majestic and beautiful. It is located at the heart of Munich City.
Kristina Kasa (11 months ago)
Very nice church on top of it have a breathtaking view of Marienplatz and of surroundings of Munchen
Anna Sabotovich (12 months ago)
Very nice, but closed now because of high covid cases in the city
Paul Varga (12 months ago)
Always a highlight climbing up at the narrow stairs up to the very top of this amazing als church right next to Marienplatz. Only few Euros costs you having the best view of all right at the centre of Munich. Don’t miss it
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