St. Peter's Church

Munich, Germany

St. Peter's Church is the oldest church in the Munich district. Before the foundation of Munich as a city in 1158, there had been a pre-Merovingian church on this site. 8th century monks lived around this church on a hill called Petersbergl. At the end of the 12th century a new church in the Bavarian Romanesque style was consecrated, and expanded in Gothic style shortly before the great fire in 1327, which destroyed the building. After its reconstruction the church was dedicated anew in 1368. In the early 17th century the 91 meter spire received its Renaissance steeple top and a new Baroque choir was added.

The interior is dominated by the high altar to which Erasmus Grasser contributed the figure of Saint Peter. Among other masterpieces of all periods are five Gothic paintings by Jan Polack and several altars by Ignaz Günther. The ceiling fresco by Johann Baptist Zimmermann (1753–1756) was re-created in 1999-2000.

The parish church of Saint Peter, whose 91 meters high tower is commonly known as Alter Peter - Old Peter - and which is emblematic of Munich, is the oldest recorded parish church in Munich and presumably the originating point for the whole city.

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Address

Rindermarkt 1, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Wischnewski (2 years ago)
Walk up the belfry, entrance fee is very low and have a great view over Munich. Pick a fine day and you can see the alps quite clearly. On a day with foehn (warm winds coming down the mountains, towards town), you'll see the alps even better.
Mobile Oppression Palace (2 years ago)
Best views of the old town of Munich. The climb can be quite the workout—a harder climb than Saint Peter’s in Rome—and the stairs are really narrow, and you would have to stop at certain spots not only to catch your breath but also to let people travelling the opposite direction through. Well worth the effort though and quite affordable at only €3.
Ketsarin Suksomthin (2 years ago)
Been there during winter so there wasn’t many people on the top which was a good time to enjoy the panoramic view of Munich and took the beautiful pictures but I didn’t get a chance to enter the church The view is beautiful but somehow you can’t quite enjoy it that much because of the iron fence around the place which is understandable due to the safety reason On the way going up there’s many handwriting all over the wall which doesn’t look nice at all Somehow I feel like the lady who sells the tickets in front of the entrance doesn’t seem happy about her responsibility tho maybe her office is too small and the weather was too cold at that time that’s why she doesn’t want to interact not a single word or a single smile Entrance fee : 3€
Mark B (2 years ago)
To be specific St Peter's church Tower. Opens at 10. If you like views and panoramics then this is the best spot in Munich. The stairs are narrow and when it's busy it must be a nightmare going up or down. It's really only suited to single file.
Ciaran Brooks (3 years ago)
Visited the church itself and also paid to go up the tower. The church is pleasant though not as spectacular as others in the area. The tower was worth the climb, with good views from the top. That said it was definitely overcrowded and perhaps there needs to be a staff member moving people around, I think it actually constituted a safety risk.
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