Munich Residenz

Munich, Germany

The Munich Residenz is the former royal palace of the Bavarian monarchs of the House of Wittelsbach. The Residenz is the largest city palace in Germany and is today open to visitors for its architecture, room decorations, and displays from the former royal collections.

The complex of buildings contains ten courtyards and displays 130 rooms. A wing of the Festsaalbau contains the Cuvilliés Theatre since the reconstruction of the Residenz after World War II. It also houses the Herkulessaal, the primary concert venue for the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. The Byzantine Court Church of All Saints at the east side is facing the Marstall, the building for the former Court Riding School and the royal stables.

he Munich Residence served as the seat of government and residence of the Bavarian dukes, electors and kings from 1508 to 1918. What began in 1385 as a castle in the north-eastern corner of the city, was transformed by the rulers over the centuries into a magnificent palace, its buildings and gardens extending further and further into the town.

The rooms and art collections spanning a period that begins with the Renaissance, and extends via the early Baroque and Rococo epochs to Neoclassicism, bear witness to the discriminating taste and the political ambition of the Wittelsbach dynasty.

Much of the Residence was destroyed during the Second World War, and from 1945 it was gradually reconstructed.

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Details

Founded: 1508
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juliana Tang (9 months ago)
Caught a classical concert there. It was awesome! So much feels. This place is also an easy walk from the centre of the city too.
Ivan De la Torre Cantos (9 months ago)
Huge historical venue operating as a museum, in which the remains of Bavarian royalty wealth can be seen. Excellent architecture and art work, although most of it is not original. Audio tour really helps understand better what you seen. Cuvilles Theatre is by far the most interesting highlight of the visit.
G McKinley (9 months ago)
The palace or castle is nothing short of amazing especially the furniture, ceilings and walls. The decorations are priceless. I would definitely go again.
Keenan Gratch (10 months ago)
Unfortunately I came a bit late so we had to rush through but from what we saw, it was beautiful. A lot of history in there. Would recommend going and I will be back again next time in Munich.
Craig Priddle (10 months ago)
Fabulous experience. Make sure you allow PLENTY of time for this palace full of treasures and beautiful rooms. There is so much to see here. One of the highlights of Munich and deserving of a full day. No café inside so don't expect that but plenty of beautiful things to see.
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