The New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) hosts the Munich government including the city council, offices of the mayors and part of the administration. In 1874 the municipality had left the Old Town Hall for its new domicile.

The town hall was built between 1867 and 1908 by Georg von Hauberrisser in a Gothic Revival architecture style. It covers an area of 9159 m² having 400 rooms. The 100 meters long main facade towards the Marienplatz is richly decorated. It shows the Guelph Duke Henry the Lion, and almost the entire line of the Wittelsbach dynasty in Bavaria and is the largest princely cycle in a German town hall. The central monument in the center of the main facade between the two phases at Marienplatz above the guard house, is an equestrian statue of Prince Regent Luitpold. The bay of the tower contains statues of the first four Bavarian kings.

The main facade is placed toward the plaza, while the back side is adjacent to a small park (Marienhof). The basement is almost completely occupied by a large restaurant called Ratskeller. On the ground floor, some rooms are rented for small businesses. Also located in the ground floor is the major official tourist information.

The first floor hosts a big balcony towards the Marienplatz which is used for large festivals such as football championships or for concerts during the Weihnachtsmarkt. Its main tower has a height of 85 m and is available for visitors with an elevator. On the top thrones the Münchner Kindl. The Rathaus-Glockenspiel, performed by an apparatus daily at 11am, 12pm and 5pm, is a tourist attraction.

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Address

Marienplatz 8, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 1867-1908
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rudi Wingert (19 months ago)
The Neue Rathaus (New Town Hall) is a magnificent neo-Gothic building from the late 19th century, which dominates, architecturally, the northern area of Marienplatz.
Olya Ivanova (20 months ago)
Magnificent and ancient architecture monument. The tower is about 85 meters, equipped with an elevator and is open for tourists
Joe Keep_it (20 months ago)
This architecture is beyond my imagination. Really brilliant mind.
Ashley Brooke (2 years ago)
When I first set eyes on this building, I cried. It is one of the finest works of architecture I have ever seen. Simply breathtaking and I can hardly believe something so beautiful actually exists. Don't miss it.
Michael J (2 years ago)
Wow, what a grand sight. Simply beautiful old building. This is a great section of town. Lots to do and see. Lots of good food.
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