Stična Abbey is the oldest monastery in the territory of today's Slovenia. It is the only Cistercian one in the country that still operates. The abbey foundation charter was issued in 1136 by Pellegrinus I., Patriarch of Aquileia, although monastic conventual life had begun a year earlier, in 1135. The monastery at Stična quickly became important religious, cultural and economic centre.

As well as an ordinary school, the monastery had a music school as well, at which the Renaissance composer Jacobus Gallus is believed to have received his earliest musical education. The successful life of the monastery was hampered by the raids of the Ottoman Turks, and it twice fell victim to burning and looting. In 1784 Emperor Joseph II abolished the monastery, dissolved under the Josephine Reforms, but resettled again in 1898 by monks from Mehrerau Abbey on the shore of lake Constance. Stična abbey works undisturbed since.

Its scriptorium was already producing beautiful illuminated Latin manuscripts in the 12th century, and it was here that the famous Stična manuscript, written in Slovene, was produced in the 15th century.

In terms of architecture, abbey changed its image, so we can observe traces and shapes of romanic, gothic in baroque buildings, the eldest core of the abbey stayed preserved. Abbey has a Basilica, named after the Sad Mother of God, which serves as a parish church. Abbey and Romanesque basilica are now declared as cultural monuments of national significance.

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Address

Stična 17, Stična, Slovenia
See all sites in Stična

Details

Founded: 1136
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Samo simonič (3 months ago)
One of the biggest Abbey in Slovenia. Idyllic place of peace and tranquillity...
Marko Lepener (5 months ago)
Nice
est est (7 months ago)
Ok
Dzangir Kolar (7 months ago)
Abby with pharmacy selling herbal tea
Paul Heller (7 months ago)
The oldest working cisterian monastery in Slovenia, from 1100. It's 8 Eur to go inside the grounds, but you can enter the church and walk around the site for free. It's a lovely complex. Plus there are some stone works that are very old that are a must-see near the main entrance displaying Christian art.
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