Sint-Truiden City Hall

Sint-Truiden, Belgium

Sint-Truiden’s historical centre includes the town hall (Stadhuis), with a 17th-century tower classified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1999 (as part of Belfries in Belgium and France). The oldest parts of the building date from the 13th century.

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Founded: 13th century
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whc.unesco.org

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3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bart Cornelissen (11 months ago)
Prima
Pami Ram (16 months ago)
Heel goed staff
Parvinder Kaur (18 months ago)
Bad staff. only two ladies are good in locket number 12
František Fujdiak (2 years ago)
Ik ben blij de Gemeente huis is ook saturdag open.echt fijn voor rwgistraatie maken.
Kristof Vanweert (4 years ago)
Woon graag in Sint-Truiden, maar van het bestuur kan ik weinig goeds zeggen: log, laks, overdreven streng op futiliteiten, zeer traag (zowel aan loket als procesmatig), ...
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Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

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Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.