Andenne Abbey Church

Andenne, Belgium

Saint Begga, great-great-grandmother of Charlemagne, founded a Merovingian abbey in Andenne circa 692. That abbey comprised seven churches, in addition to two separate quarters. In the 11th century, the monastery was changed intoa secular chapter. Secular power required recruitment among the nobility. That is why the early monastery becamea predominantly female Noble Chapter.

In 1762, the seven churches were in a very poor state. The Chapter obtained permission from the Empress Maria-Theresa of Austria to replace them with a single sanctuary. It entrusted L-B Dewez, the official architect of the governor Charles de Lorraine, with drawing up the plans for a new neoclassical collegiate church. The objects discovered in the latter church included the grave of a 12th century saint, a lectern taking the form of a griffin (dinanderie brass from 1510), the stalls from 17th century, the confessionals and pulpit from the 18th century, paintings from 17th century and 18th century, including the Massacre of the Innocents (1615) by Finsonius of Bruges.

In the Collection and Museum located in the 12 adjoining rooms, objects are exhibited such as textiles, sculptures, manuscripts, prints, funerary monuments from the 16th century to the 20th century, including the Renaissance reliquary ofSaint Begga together with religious chinaware from Andenne.

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Details

Founded: 692 AD
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

www.andennetourisme.be

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Celine Oosterlynck (5 months ago)
Beautiful religious monument located in the heart of Andenne. Do not forget your blue disk when you park for the visit ...
Jeanne & Juliette Dumont (5 months ago)
Much good. I volunteer for floral decoration and other services. Magnificent collegiate church which is the work of Henri Benoît Dewé. To visit.
Joan Thiry (5 months ago)
Very beautiful building, well suited place of meditation.
V. Jamoulle (7 months ago)
Fountain and Porte Sainte Etienne, nice site!
Benoit Marneffe (10 months ago)
Too much distancing. Church in need of major renovation.
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