Toolse Castle

Kunda, Estonia

The castle of Toolse was built in 1471 by the Livonian Order as defence against pirates sailing in the Gulf of Finland. During the Livonian War it changed hands several times, was apparently destroyed and later rebuilt. In 1581 French mercenary Pontus de la Gardie captured the castle for Sweden from Russia which had held it since 1558. The castle was destroyed again during the Great Northern War, ever since which it has laid in its current state of ruin.

Reference: 7is7.com

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Address

Laane 5, Kunda, Estonia
See all sites in Kunda

Details

Founded: 1471
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kilian Ochs (2 years ago)
Almost untouched by any modern culture influences, this relict remains a mystic guard at the sea. The combination of stone and sea forms a beautiful mix. One can imagine the pride and elegance of this fortress once it was alive.
Joonas Böckler (2 years ago)
Fortress worth of visiting. Free of charge and if you visit on workdays, there's a big possibility you're the only one on the site. It can be a little bit of confusing, since it looks like you have to go thru someones household to reach the fortress. But just follow the path and continue your exploration! + I suggest wearing a trainers, not flip-flops.
Kerti Alev (2 years ago)
Nice place for a hike and piece of history.
Markus Mölder (2 years ago)
Good friday
kuro neko (3 years ago)
A piece of nearly forgotten history.
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