Bistra Carthusian Monastery was founded in 1255 as the first monastery in Carniola. The first half of the 14th century represents the culmination of the monastery. This is when the monastery greatly expanded and invested in the functioning of the monastic library, where they created a number of copies and original works. Later began the slow decay of the monastery which was repeatedly hit by fires and in 1670 by a strong earthquake. The final collapse of the monastery came when the Emperor Joseph II commanded the dissolution of the monasteries which did not contributed to the prosperity of the country.

The property was split into several parts - some were confiscated, some passed into the hands of the Church and some were sold. The castle’s image, as you can admire it today, was shaped after many renovations in the mid-19th century, when the grounds became the property of the Galle family. In 1945 the property was nationalized, and since 1951, the castle is a cultural monument of national importance and the place of the Technical Museum of Slovenia.

The attention of most visitors is drawn towards the water-driven elements - the flour mill, blacksmith’s workshop, fulling mill and veneer sawmill, and some temporary exhibitions. Road vehicle fans won’t be disappointed either. They can admire the oldest surviving car from Slovenia or enjoy the sight of the limousines that once belonged to President Tito, Premier of former Yugoslavia.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Bistra 5, Bistra, Slovenia
See all sites in Bistra

Details

Founded: 1255
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zachary Weiss (21 months ago)
Great museum. A lot of cars and motorcycles. They had a section on hunting in Slovenia which was very interesting.
Tomaž Ščuka (22 months ago)
One of bigger if not the bigest technical museum in Slovenia. The vehicle and motorbike collection is a must see. Kids will love it. It takes a while to see all the museum collection. Better to reserve the whole day. Museum is situated in the country side making it a nice place for a walk. Museum offers a free entry on 8th of February each year which is a national holiday (remembering the bigest Slovenian poet France Prešeren).
Ada Oritz (22 months ago)
Ver y enjoyable and very varied and entertaining. We were glad to read English in the exhibitions.
Gildara (2 years ago)
Nice exposition of cars and interesing story of the guide
Miha H (2 years ago)
Very interesting museum for everyone interested in the technical stuff. There are all kinds of exhibitions my favorite one is the one representing forest, wood processing and carpentry. However, be avare it could be very cold in the winter. Kids favorite are the cars of former president Tito.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Luxembourg Palace

The famous Italian Medici family have given two queens to France: Catherine, the spouse of Henry II, and Marie, widow of Henry IV, who built the current Luxembourg palace. Maria di Medici had never been happy at the Louvre, still semi-medieval, where the fickle king, did not hesitate to receive his mistresses. The death of Henry IV, assassinated in 1610, left the way open for Marie's project. When she became regent, she was able to give special attention to the construction of an imposing modern residence that would be reminiscent of the Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens in Florence, where she grew up. The development of the 25-hectare park, which was to serve as a jewel-case for the palace, began immediately.

The architect, Salomon de Brosse, began the work in 1615. Only 16 years later was the palace was completed. Palace of Luxembourg affords a transition between the Renaissance and the Classical period.

In 1750, the Director of the King's Buildings installed in the wing the first public art-gallery in France, in which French and foreign canvases of the royal collections are shown. The Count of Provence and future Louis XVIII, who was living in Petit Luxembourg, had this gallery closed in 1780: leaving to emigrate, he fled from the palace in June 1791.

During the French Revolution the palace was first abandoned and then moved as a national prison. After that it was the seat of the French Directory, and in 1799, the home of the Sénat conservateur and the first residence of Napoleon Bonaparte, as First Consul of the French Republic. The old apartments of Maria di Medici were altered. The floor, which the 80 senators only occupied in 1804, was built in the middle of the present Conference Hall.

Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade so precisely that it is difficult to distinguish at first glance the old from the new. The new senate chamber was located in what would have been the courtyard area in-between.

The new wing included a library (bibliothèque) with a cycle of paintings (1845–1847) by Eugène Delacroix. In the 1850s, at the request of Emperor Napoleon III, Gisors created the highly decorated Salle des Conférences, which influenced the nature of subsequent official interiors of the Second Empire, including those of the Palais Garnier.

During the German occupation of Paris (1940–1944), Hermann Göring took over the palace as the headquarters of the Luftwaffe in France, taking for himself a sumptuous suite of rooms to accommodate his visits to the French capital. Since 1958 the Luxembourg palace has been the seat of the French Senate of the Fifth Republic.