Bistra Carthusian Monastery was founded in 1255 as the first monastery in Carniola. The first half of the 14th century represents the culmination of the monastery. This is when the monastery greatly expanded and invested in the functioning of the monastic library, where they created a number of copies and original works. Later began the slow decay of the monastery which was repeatedly hit by fires and in 1670 by a strong earthquake. The final collapse of the monastery came when the Emperor Joseph II commanded the dissolution of the monasteries which did not contributed to the prosperity of the country.

The property was split into several parts - some were confiscated, some passed into the hands of the Church and some were sold. The castle’s image, as you can admire it today, was shaped after many renovations in the mid-19th century, when the grounds became the property of the Galle family. In 1945 the property was nationalized, and since 1951, the castle is a cultural monument of national importance and the place of the Technical Museum of Slovenia.

The attention of most visitors is drawn towards the water-driven elements - the flour mill, blacksmith’s workshop, fulling mill and veneer sawmill, and some temporary exhibitions. Road vehicle fans won’t be disappointed either. They can admire the oldest surviving car from Slovenia or enjoy the sight of the limousines that once belonged to President Tito, Premier of former Yugoslavia.

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Address

Bistra 5, Bistra, Slovenia
See all sites in Bistra

Details

Founded: 1255
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zachary Weiss (2 years ago)
Great museum. A lot of cars and motorcycles. They had a section on hunting in Slovenia which was very interesting.
Tomaž Ščuka (2 years ago)
One of bigger if not the bigest technical museum in Slovenia. The vehicle and motorbike collection is a must see. Kids will love it. It takes a while to see all the museum collection. Better to reserve the whole day. Museum is situated in the country side making it a nice place for a walk. Museum offers a free entry on 8th of February each year which is a national holiday (remembering the bigest Slovenian poet France Prešeren).
Ada Oritz (2 years ago)
Ver y enjoyable and very varied and entertaining. We were glad to read English in the exhibitions.
Gildara (3 years ago)
Nice exposition of cars and interesing story of the guide
Miha H (3 years ago)
Very interesting museum for everyone interested in the technical stuff. There are all kinds of exhibitions my favorite one is the one representing forest, wood processing and carpentry. However, be avare it could be very cold in the winter. Kids favorite are the cars of former president Tito.
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