Château de Flaugergues

Montpellier, France

The Château de Flaugergues is one of many follies erected by wealthy merchants surrounding the city. The castle preserves antique furniture and collection of Flemish tapestries.

The follies in the region were constructed by aristocrats serving the French king. In 1696, Etienne de Flaugergues, member of the Cour des Comptes, bought a piece of land and built which henceforth carried his name. It took him 45 years to give the existing house its current appearance. From then on, Flaugergues became an example for the various other follies constructed by wealthy merchants surrounding Montpellier.

In 1811, the Boussairolles family bought the estate, and Charles Joseph de Boussairoles designed the orangerie and the park in English garden style in 1850. Inherited by generations of nobles, it still gives an idea of the life of the French nobility in the 17th century.

It is not so much the building itself as the use that is made of the area surrounding it that makes Flaugergues interesting architecturally speaking. The architect is not known, but it is certain that there have been multiple people working on the estate between 1696 and 1730. Much use is made of the difference in terrain level, creating separate spaces within the garden and making the mansion look grander than it in fact is.

The façade is cut in half by a doorway with Doric pilasters, carrying an entablature with rose sculpted metopes. The different levels of the house are emphasized by bands, which was fashionable in the 17th century. The large windows give the first level an air of importance, while the back wall of the building is almost blind.

The most striking part of Flaugergues is the interior, with the staircase taking up almost one-third of it. Every floor is served by this staircase with its characteristic hanging key vaults and forged iron banisters.

Since Roman times, vines have been grown on this spot. A descendant of Jean-Baptiste Colbert now produces the Flaugergues wine.

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Details

Founded: 1696-1741
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Janez Golež (3 years ago)
very nice place
Terry Gibbs (3 years ago)
Very interesting and some excellent locally produced wines
OFS OFS (3 years ago)
World Aquaculture Conference function held here last night. 65 Euro pp. This function was very disappointing and disorganized and frankly a rip off!!!. A few canapé per person and you couldn't just have one type of wine. ..had to progress to red with tab cards!!! (I don't drink red wine). Only a few tables serving wine so we had to leave our conversations to line up for a drink or canapé. Very few places to sit so that meant the majority of the 500+ guest had to stand for hours!! This has to be the worst function I have ever been to!!
N. Visser (3 years ago)
Nice people, nice castle, nice wine. Very interesting tour. Definitely check it out.
Mario Presutti (3 years ago)
I have known Chateau de flaugergues the las 20 years and their wine is still my favorit French wine. I can recoment their red and rose, rose is good cold when it is summer. I just tastet it again after 15 years and it brings back memories of time long gone. I look forward to tast their red wine later this evening.
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