Temple of Diana

Nîmes, France

The so-called Temple of Diana was part of the Roman sacred complex but it was not a temple, rather it was a library that originally faced onto a portico that enclosed much of the spring sanctuary. The date is uncertain; some scholars suggest the first century, others the second. It was used as a church from the Middle Ages till the 16th century when it was damaged in the Wars of Religion.

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Details

Founded: 0-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

archive.archaeology.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Natalie Daz (8 months ago)
Roman building from the 1st century. Despite its name, there is no archaeological or literary evidence to indicate that it is a temple or even that it was dedicated to Diana. Rather, it is thought to have been a library. In the Middle Ages it housed a monastery, which explains why it has been partially preserved to this day.
Alex Santos (2 years ago)
Very small temple, but worth a quick visit
Ana (3 years ago)
Beautiful Roman construction inside the park, I was really surprised by the maintenance and care they have provided to keep the temple in such good condition. An unmissable place of Nime
Faisal IQBAL (3 years ago)
What you'll see is just ruins. But if you like history and ancient architecture then you'd love these remainings.
John Payne (4 years ago)
2,000 year old place of worship
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