Jardins de la Fontaine

Nîmes, France

The Jardins de la Fontaine (Gardens of the Fountain) are built around the Roman thermae ruins. The remains of Roman baths were discovered on the site in the eigheenth century and the gardens were laid out using the old foundations with canals, terraces and water-basins.

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Details

Founded: 100-200 AD
Category:
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alina MIMI (16 months ago)
This place created for absolute pleasure, to relax, to take lovely pictures! I have been passing through this place at night! All ponds, fountains, artificial streams are lit up/Illuminated.... Great place to walk!
Mark Hopman (16 months ago)
Even in November, this place was beautiful to visit. The statues are reproductions - the originals safely tucked away in the Louvre, but the garden is very well maintained and historically important. The signs in the park are, however, all in French. Although I had no trouble reading them, I can imagine the disappointment for non-francophones who really want to visit this place, only to find out that they can't read the signs. I would also recommend a short stop at the Temple of Diana in the park.
yasmina lahlou (16 months ago)
The perfect place to go with family, friends or your loved one. A beautiful garden in the heart of the city
Wight Wiccan Grove of Nemetona (18 months ago)
Situated in the town of Nimes in Provence South Western France. The town map was easily followed and the Garden of the Fountains was approached via mature tree laden and watercoursed streets offering shade on a particularly hot day in the high 30's. It was only about 2 km to the Garden, but alas the Fountains were all off. The landscaped Garden offered some trees for shade. But in the South West corner there was a treat for me. The ancient Temple to the Goddess Diana was evocative, with well kept remains and made the trip special.
Mackie McIntosh (2 years ago)
This park was the highlight of our day trip to Nimes. The park has a large expanse of fountains and water features and is situated on a natural spring. There are nice placards throughout the park explaining the geologic and historical context. There is an old Roman temple to explore, and there is also an old Roman watchtower at the top of the hill. We spent over an hour exploring the paths and gardens.
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