Château de Penne

Penne, France

The first reference to a castle in the village of Penne dates from 825 AD and its first known señor was Geoffroi, mentioned in 1096 in documents related to Raymond, Count of Toulouse. Throughout the Middle Ages (5th to 15th centuries) the site of Penne was of military strategic importance, being situated on the borders of the provinces of Albigeois, Quercy and Rouergue, with its fortress perched atop a cliff overlooking the River Aveyron.

The castle remained in use, seeing repeated conflicts, such as the Hundred Years War(1337-1453) between England and France, and the French Wars of Religion (1562–1598) between Protestants and Roman Catholics during which it was partly destroyed. It was then abandoned for approximately 400 years.

The remains of the castle include the dungeon, the ramparts and a chapel.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Le Village, Penne, France
See all sites in Penne

Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philip Jackson (6 months ago)
Fabulous.
Juanca Wagner (7 months ago)
Top view
Shelagh Crowson (2 years ago)
Fabulous views and still in its raw state
Chris Lee (2 years ago)
Fascinating stuff, a sprawling fortress ruin in the process of being renovated, yet a much better insight into the Bastides than those chateaux still standing. Comes complete with detailed documentation in various languages on the origins, historical development and the social context of the Chateau, all within the charming old town of Penne.
Mark Oppenheim (2 years ago)
Absolutely spectacular ruined castle on a mind disturbing overhang. The castle is under gradual restoration using (largely) contemporary technology. Fortunately the workmen are allowed to use modern harness given the terrifying cliffs they are working above, but they still use stone mallets and human powered cranes (powered with giant hamster wheels). The guide book was detailed and interesting and views from the top stunning: the castle is situated so it that originally it could defend/prey-upon traffic on two rivers, one flowing on either side of the castle.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.