Pilistvere Church

Kõo, Estonia

The first record of local priest in Pilistvere date back to the year 1234. The stone church was built in the second half of the 13th century. It was constructed on the example of Suure-Jaani and other Järvamaa churches. Pilistvere church resembles these by the arched choir area, nave and the tower. The church was destroyed several times during 17th to 18th century. It was reconstructed in 1762 which is also stated in the eastern wall of the church. The tower, built in 1856, was destroyed in 1905 and reconstructed in 1990.

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Address

Pilistvere küla, Kõo, Estonia
See all sites in Kõo

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vitaly Vlasov (2 years ago)
Very nice place in small silence town. Visited concert of Hanno Padar &Co here.
Niirt Kiul (2 years ago)
? Nice historic place - even though it needs some refreshing, it looks good and has its own spirit.
Anvar Arro (2 years ago)
Really beautifule church and people's are really nice and friendly. I met really nice woman and his dog who are working in church.
Linda Richardson (3 years ago)
This Church is situated in a beautiful village which I would love to see brought back to life again. It is, I think, a special place.
aleksi p (4 years ago)
Good old church
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