Pilistvere Church

Kõo, Estonia

The first record of local priest in Pilistvere date back to the year 1234. The stone church was built in the second half of the 13th century. It was constructed on the example of Suure-Jaani and other Järvamaa churches. Pilistvere church resembles these by the arched choir area, nave and the tower. The church was destroyed several times during 17th to 18th century. It was reconstructed in 1762 which is also stated in the eastern wall of the church. The tower, built in 1856, was destroyed in 1905 and reconstructed in 1990.

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Address

Pilistvere küla, Kõo, Estonia
See all sites in Kõo

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ulvi Praks (8 months ago)
karelmalken (13 months ago)
Liina Ostumaa (2 years ago)
Kena kirik aga eriti ilus in kiriku ümbrus, järve ja jõe juures olev piirkond. Suvel võimalik ujumas käia, vesiratta laenutus ja armas Ingli kohvik.
Arne Lykepak (2 years ago)
Ilus vana kirik
Anatoly Ko (6 years ago)
Pilistvere, Kõo, Viljandimaa, 58.663058, 25.749207 ‎ 58° 39' 47.01", 25° 44' 57.15" Сводчатое помещение хоров, продольное здание и башня указывают на то, что воздвигнутая во второй половине 13 века каменная церковь, была выстроена по примеру церквей Сууре-Яани и Ярвамаа. Неоднократно разрушенную на протяжении 17-18 веков церковь значительно реконструировали в 1762 году. Об этом напоминает дата на восточном фронтоне церкви. Относящийся к 1856 году башенный шлем разрушился в 1905 году и был восстановлен в 1990 году.•Местный священник был упомянут в первоисточниках уже в 1234 году.•Церковь Пилиствере имеет самую высокую башню среди сельских церквей Эстонии.
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