Abbey of Saint-Gilles

Saint-Gilles, France

The Abbey of Saint-Gilles is included in the UNESCO Heritage List, as part of the World Heritage Sites of the Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France. According to the legend, it was founded in the 7th century by saint Giles, over lands which had been given him by the Visigoth King Wamba after he had involuntarily wounded the saint during a hunt. The monastery was initially dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul: however, in the 9th century, the dedication was changed to St. Giles himself, who had become one of the most venerated figures in the area. His relics were housed in the abbey church and attracted numerous pilgrims.

In the 11th century, the monastery was attached to Cluny abbey. Thanks to its prosperity, it was enlarged and decorated from the 12th to the 15th century, when the cloiser was finished. In the 16th century the church, in the course of the Wars of Religion, was devastated when the Huguenots took shelter in it. Restorations were held in the 17th century and again, after further damage during the French Revolution, in the 19th century. The tomb of St. Giles was rediscovered in 1865, becoming again a pilgrim destination from 1965.

The abbey church is in typical southern French Romanesque style. The façade, built from 1120 to 1160, has a decorated entrance portico with three portals with Corinthian columns and medieval sculpture decorations. These include, in the lower sector, a bestiary and scenes from the Old Testament. The bell tower dates to the 18th century.

The crypt, or lower church, dates to the early 11th century. It measures 50 by 25 meters, and occupies the whole subterranean section of the nave. In its center is the tomb of St. Giles, a medieval place of veneration until in the 16th century, his relics were moved to the Basilica of Saint Sernin at Toulouse. The upper church, with a nave and two apses, mostly belongs to the 17th-century reconstruction, aside from the massive pillars in Corinthian style.

Behind the apse are the remains of the ancient choir, which once were part of the originally longer church. Inside the northern wall of the ancient choir is a spiral staircase dating to the 12th century, made of cantilevered stone steps.

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Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

frelon 30 (2 years ago)
Très belle architecture, inscrite à l'Unesco sa façade à été rénovée en 2018 et bénéficie d'une nouvelle esplanade. Site à voir seul ou en famille
Benoit Bouchet (3 years ago)
Tout est refait à neuf cet magnifique
Christophe Boulogne (3 years ago)
Une partie extérieur en rénovation comme l'entrée de l'abbaye. Intérieur bien entretenu, a visité la voûte pour 3 euro, le vestiges de notre passé.
Jorge Bermell (3 years ago)
Muy bonita y vale la pena. Esta en reformas y les queda mucho.
romane lily (3 years ago)
La façade de l abbitiale a été nettoyée et les immeubles réhabilités le tout donne une place rénovée pas encore tout à fait finie mais claire et élégante et belle
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