Olustvere manor was founded in the second half on the 16th century. At the end of the 18th century the manor came into the possession of the Fersens - an ancient noble family from Northern Germany. The manor stayed in their possession until its expropriation by the Republic of Estonia in 1918.

Olustvere is one of the best preserved manorial estate ensembles in Estonia. The current English-style main building was completed in 1903. The estate manager`s house, granary, drying hose of massive stones, distillery, stables and cattle-sheds and several other houses have also preserved.

The surrounding park covers an area of 20 ha. It was founded in the English style and is characterized by well-matching groups of trees and bushes, winding paths, beautiful pands and spacious lawns. The oldest tree in the park is a 300-year old two-branched oak, what is called “the oak of love”. The famous Olustvere maple, oak, linden and ash tree avenues that total 10 kilometres also start in the park.

Today the manor hosts Olustvere Service and Agricultural School, what teaches agriculture, catering, tourism and secretary management.

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paavo Brauer (5 months ago)
Visited during “open farm days”. Nice surroundings and park
Morpheus Sleep (6 months ago)
It's a great place to study
Risto Nuotio (15 months ago)
One of the nicest and well kept country manors in Estonia.
Rodolfo Andrés Ramirez Valenzuela (15 months ago)
Really beautiful, calm and relaxing place you will have a great visit here specially if you like peaceful places. There is a big pond with a lot of ducks, the place has a lot of history behind it so make sure you read it beforehand, along with this its scenery is just beautiful .
Alex Timofeyev (16 months ago)
Nice and quiet, beautiful park and garden. Don't forget to visit workshops and the craft gift store.
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