Olustvere manor was founded in the second half on the 16th century. At the end of the 18th century the manor came into the possession of the Fersens - an ancient noble family from Northern Germany. The manor stayed in their possession until its expropriation by the Republic of Estonia in 1918.

Olustvere is one of the best preserved manorial estate ensembles in Estonia. The current English-style main building was completed in 1903. The estate manager`s house, granary, drying hose of massive stones, distillery, stables and cattle-sheds and several other houses have also preserved.

The surrounding park covers an area of 20 ha. It was founded in the English style and is characterized by well-matching groups of trees and bushes, winding paths, beautiful pands and spacious lawns. The oldest tree in the park is a 300-year old two-branched oak, what is called “the oak of love”. The famous Olustvere maple, oak, linden and ash tree avenues that total 10 kilometres also start in the park.

Today the manor hosts Olustvere Service and Agricultural School, what teaches agriculture, catering, tourism and secretary management.

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kenneth Vallik (19 months ago)
Väga ilus kompleks
Marko Medar (2 years ago)
Pearl of Põhja-Sakala!!! Must place to visit
William Johnson (2 years ago)
Olustvere Manor near Suure-Jaani in the country of Estonia is well worth a visit. It lies about 80 miles south of the capital, Tallinn and as well as a canteen and lovely cafe, there are various craft units in buildings including needlework, blacksmith and glass production. The manor itself is very ornate and regal.
Frank Gortzak (2 years ago)
Great for party
Andrei J (3 years ago)
Amazing park with lots of track to walk
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