Saint-Roman Cave Abbey

Beaucaire, France

The Abbey of Saint-Roman is a cave monastery which includes the ruins of a castle (château de Saint-Roman-d'Aiguille), a chapel, cloisters, terrace, tombs and walls. It was constructed in the 9th, 10th, 12th and 15th centuries.

The abbey is reached by a signposted path from Beaucaire which leads past a vast chamber and the monks’ cells to the chapel carved out of the rock which contains the tomb of St Roman. From the terrace, there is a fine view over the Rhône, Avignon and the Mont Ventoux area with Tarascon in the foreground.

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Address

Beaucaire, France
See all sites in Beaucaire

Details

Founded: 9th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paula Cronin (13 months ago)
Very unique place. Recommended bringing a little big spray for the walk in if mosquitoes like you. Pretty easy paved walk up
Valerie B (19 months ago)
Very nice place to visit and get away from the city! Very impressive!
Anandahy B (2 years ago)
Loved it! Information available in English and German.
Merijam Ananda Babic (2 years ago)
Interesting visit. Information available in English.
E KK (2 years ago)
The walk to the top is 15mins and quite steep but totally worth it. The view on the Rhone is impressive. The structures of the abbey are unique and the guide is very friendly and extremely knowledgeable about the place (he has been a guide for 40 years on this site)
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