Château de Castelnou

Castelnou, France

From 990 AD, Château de Castelnou served as the administrative and military capital of the Viscount of Vallespir. Its irregular pentagonal plan follows the rocky outcrop on which it was built, this elevated position providing defence against enemy attacks.

The castle was taken by the troops of James II of Majorca en 1286, and again in 1483. Largely demolished in 1559, it was no longer restored or inhabited and deteriorated throughout the 17th and 18th centuries. At the time of the French Revolution it became the property of the commune. It was sold to Viscount Satgé in 1875 and, by 1900, had become again an elegant and habitable fortress. It was acquired in 1946 by Charles-Emmanuel Brousse who was married to Amy Elizabeth Thorpe, a famed American spy. Having been ravaged by a terrible fire, in 1987 it was sold and has since been restored.

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Castelnou, France
See all sites in Castelnou

Details

Founded: 990 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lilian Jordy (18 months ago)
Picturesque village and castle, timeless place! I feel like I'm in a fairytale each time I come here.
Gary Bilkus (2 years ago)
Great location but unfortunately closed for renovation, and you only find out after climbing a steep hill.....
I To (2 years ago)
If you are in the area, don't hesitate to visite this medieval village! Especially the bar with the terrace with view on the valley.
Claudia Maris (2 years ago)
Really lovely castle, great scenery unfortunately it was closed for work when we tried to revisit two weeks ago but the village of Castelnou is definitely worth seeing. There are some great craft shops, bars and restaurants. We visited in October and May and had no problems parking either time. A must visit!
Antonio Ca' Zorzi (2 years ago)
Very impressive castle on top of a mountain wich overlooks two valleys. The ruins are majestic.
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