Scharfenberg Castle Ruins

Annweiler, Germany

Scharfenberg Castle (popularly also called Münz), is the ruin of a medieval rock castle above the small South Palatine town of Annweiler.

Scharfenberg and its sister castles, Trifels and Anebos are known as the Trifels Group and are the symbol of Annweiler, which sprawls beneath them in the valley meadows of the River Queich. In the immediate vicinity lie the sites of two other castles, the Fensterfels and the Has.

The landmark of the castle is a 20-metre-high bergfried, whose walls are made of rusticated ashlars from the Hohenstaufen era. In addition, parts of the well tower and enceinte may still be seen.

Scharfenberg Castle was built in the first half of the 12th century under the Hohenstaufen king, Conrad III, who died in 1152. It was initially probably used as a state gaol. After its subsequent owners, a ministeriales family, had been named Scharfenberg, it became the seat of the most important member of the family in the early 13th centyr, the Bishop of Speyer and Chancellor of the Holy Roman Empire, Conrad III of Scharfenberg. Since its destruction during the Peasants' War in 1525, the castle has lain in ruins.

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stacy william mims said 13 months ago
i believe i am a direct decendent my birth name was stacy william scharfenberg my grand father gave me a wooden arrow with "5 minuten " on it i was later adopted by joe m mims jr any information availible please forward it to stacymims2019@outlook.com


Address

Annweiler, Germany
See all sites in Annweiler

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Glötzl (22 months ago)
Als Urbexer sind öffentliche Ruine voll öde ^^
Numer Obis (2 years ago)
Kleinere Ruine. Der Turm sieht recht gut erhalten aus, scheint aber nicht begehbar zu sein. Zumindest war kein Eingang zu finden. Schöner Punkt für eine Wanderung, da mehrere Burgen und Aussichtspunkte in der Nähe sind.
Janek Kozicki (2 years ago)
Nice
Lorenz Schindlbeck (2 years ago)
Also called the Mint, this former fortress was believed to have housed the mint of Annweiler. Only the tower and part of the fortress walls remain. The tower is not accessible. There are still beautiful views of the surroundings to be had.
Steffen Meyer (3 years ago)
One of the many medieval castle ruins on Rhineland-Palatinate.
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