Tratzberg Castle

Tratzberg, Austria

Documented for the first time in the 13th century the Tratzberg castle was used as former border stronghold against the Bavarians and as Emperor Maximilian’s I hunting lodge. In the late 15th century the former fortress was destroyed by fire. The Emperor did not rebuild Tratzberg but exchanged the ruin for a castle of the Taenzels, wealthy owners of a silver mine. They had built the first late Gothic part of today’s Castle Tratzberg in 1500, in a particularly magnificent way, with artful ornaments made of marble, wood and iron. In 1554, Georg Knight of Ilsung, a wealthy merchant from Augsburg, acquired the castle, expanded and changed Tratzberg according to the spirit of the Renaissance age. Proof of those changes is the splendidly painted courtyard and exquisite Renaissance parlours. In 1590 Tratzberg came into the possession of the Fuggers, a well-known and wealthy family of merchants, who expanded the castle even further. Most of the now conserved inventory is from this time.

After several changes of owners there was a time when Tratzberg was uninhabited for 150 years. When Franz Count Enzenberg married Ottilie Countess Tannenberg in 1847, the rather neglected castle came into the possession of the Enzenberg family, and it has stayed their homestead since then. Thanks to the family’s dedication and efforts the 6800 sqm castle with its 5000 sqm shingle roof became a gem of a 16th century Tyrolean castle again. It is now one of the most important cultural monuments of the country and open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1500
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.schloss-tratzberg.at

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Xanadu Xie (7 months ago)
Old and historical castle! good guide and tour!
silvio moeller (7 months ago)
BEST CASTLE EVER!!!! Thank you for having us. we saw many castles and alike but this place is OUTSTANDING! it feels like you are back in the 17th century and the people just left the place. the owners must spend a hell of money to keep this place in shape. everything is done perfectly and with love - so many details to watch. AND: you can enjoy it online/virtual from home if you cannot get enough. good for my daughter & son: we saw the earl in person! KEEP ON WORKING - you make people very happy!
Branko Barišić (8 months ago)
Great condition castle, really interesting to visit. Super tour guide Anna and also super train driver ??
JeanClaude VanDarnItAll (9 months ago)
Very nicely done, the Chambers are amazing. That's why it's too bad that the hosts are rushing to each next Chamber, I wish there was more time to Explore the rooms a bit more.
Dennis de Bruin (10 months ago)
Very nice (virtual reality)tour and very impressive castle. Well maintained and beautiful rooms. The kids tour is brilliant!
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