Tratzberg Castle

Tratzberg, Austria

Documented for the first time in the 13th century the Tratzberg castle was used as former border stronghold against the Bavarians and as Emperor Maximilian’s I hunting lodge. In the late 15th century the former fortress was destroyed by fire. The Emperor did not rebuild Tratzberg but exchanged the ruin for a castle of the Taenzels, wealthy owners of a silver mine. They had built the first late Gothic part of today’s Castle Tratzberg in 1500, in a particularly magnificent way, with artful ornaments made of marble, wood and iron. In 1554, Georg Knight of Ilsung, a wealthy merchant from Augsburg, acquired the castle, expanded and changed Tratzberg according to the spirit of the Renaissance age. Proof of those changes is the splendidly painted courtyard and exquisite Renaissance parlours. In 1590 Tratzberg came into the possession of the Fuggers, a well-known and wealthy family of merchants, who expanded the castle even further. Most of the now conserved inventory is from this time.

After several changes of owners there was a time when Tratzberg was uninhabited for 150 years. When Franz Count Enzenberg married Ottilie Countess Tannenberg in 1847, the rather neglected castle came into the possession of the Enzenberg family, and it has stayed their homestead since then. Thanks to the family’s dedication and efforts the 6800 sqm castle with its 5000 sqm shingle roof became a gem of a 16th century Tyrolean castle again. It is now one of the most important cultural monuments of the country and open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1500
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.schloss-tratzberg.at

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Enikő Gargya (2 years ago)
Great exhibition! Loved the tour! Thank you!
monica pronzini (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle to visit with a lot to see especially if you are interested in history (objects, paintings, weapons, furniture and more). A little train takes you up from the parking to the castle and down, but the walk down through the wood is wonderful, too, you just need some comfortable shoes. A playground and a restaurant at the bottom help you (and your children) while waiting for the train or for a final snack after the visit. Recommended, we have already visited it twice.
Su Palmer (3 years ago)
This castle is definitely recommended you can get to and from it by the land train! The staff were so friendly. The castle itself was just beautiful the history is just amazing the artefacts are mind blowing I'm not really into looking round castles but I have to say I was blown away. The armoury room was something else!!! I would say to anyone who is staying in the area it's definitely worth a visit the views from some of the rooms are stunning all in all a very enjoyable visit and would return again
Eszter Lakos (3 years ago)
The castle is well preserved and providing audio guides in different languages is a super idea. However, be mindful that there are separate charges for parking, taking the little train up to the castle and even for certain rides at the playground. The ticket office does not take credit cards and does not accept large notes. Children friendly, my 4 years old really enjoyed his own audio guide, however, bring a baby carrier when travelling with young children as buggies are not allowed in the castle. There is an outdoor playground. The restaurant provides a good selection of basic food, it offers menu for children, however there is a long wait for the food even when only few tables are occupied.
John Piper (3 years ago)
Smashing! Most interesting with carry around well recorded pre-recorded talk in several languages. Always guided tours to protect the furniture and fittings. Some very early items on display, and explained well n Good restaurant too.
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