Landsee Castle was built in the 12th century. The mighty complex is one of Europe’s biggest defensive structures. The Esterhazy family has owned the fortress for centuries. In the 18th century a fire destroyed the bastion that was once thought of as impregnable.

The view from the castle keep of the Pannonian plain, across to the Geschriebenstein and the foothills of the Alps, is unsurpassed. The imposing site, set in unspoiled scenery, exerts a special attraction.

The five defensive walls and five-storey keep are an impressive sight. There are interesting guided tours for adults and children; a well-signposted route transports visitors to a time long ago.

Today the still imposing ruins are overgrown with trees and shrubs. The ruins have been given a lease of new life with the creation of the nature reserve and as a venue for open-air events.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.burgenland.info

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Klaus Rubba (2 years ago)
Small admission fee, and glad to see it is going I to restoring the place and build out of some facilities. Always love visiting this place, huge ruins, plenty in tact, and great views
Mili Badic (2 years ago)
It's bigger and more interesting than you think...take some time to explore and enjoy the beautiful view.
Tomáš Kosina (2 years ago)
We visited this when noone was there - at the end of August, Friday morning. So it was quiet and relaxing place to be, with wonderful views.
L. M.G. (2 years ago)
Nice place 2 visit. ....With a great view from the tower. ...recommended for people who love the nature and history. .
Margarete Scow (3 years ago)
What an interesting place. I was there in October and with the color of the trees absolutely beautiful. Make sure and climb the tower ca 250 steps and don't forget to visit that small graveyard on the right side of the road when driving to the ruins.
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