Eisenstadt Cathedral

Eisenstadt, Austria

St. Martin's Cathedral in Eisenstadt was first mentioned 1264. From this chapel there are still remains of a Romanesque foundation in the area of the present choir. In the 13th century the chapel was extended by the addition of an early Gothic choir. In the 14th century a chapel for lay people was added. In 1460 the church was rebuilt under the town captain Johann Siebenhirter as a fortified or defensive church, as an attack by the Turks was expected after the Fall of Constantinople in 1453. The Gothic building was finished in 1522. After the great fire of 1589 almost 30 years passed before construction of the severely damaged church took place, between 1610 and 1629.

In 1777 a large altarpiece by Stefan Dorffmeister was added, depicting 'The Transfiguration of St. Martin'. In the following year the Viennese organ builder Malleck installed an organ to instructions from Joseph Haydn.

After the creation of the Diocese of Eisenstadt, St. Martin's Church was elevated to the rank of cathedral in 1960. Saint Martin became the patron saint of the diocese and the Land. Under Bishop Stephan László in 1960 the interior and windows were renewed.

The cathedral is famous for its church music. Concerts of the annual Haydn Festival also take place here.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Alessio Mavri (14 months ago)
A Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to Saint Martin. It has been the seat of the Bishop of Eisenstadt since the creation of the diocese in 1960. The cathedral is famous for its church music. Concerts of the annual Haydn Festival also take place here.
Attila Tényi (22 months ago)
Gótikus alapokon álló templom Máig megőrizte e stílus alapvető jegyeit. Belseje sem túldíszített.
Eduard Fikisz (2 years ago)
Sehr würdevoll
Mona Monamona (2 years ago)
Eine schöne Orgel und eine prächtige Barockkanzel....man muss es sich nicht ansehen
Heribert Schieg (3 years ago)
Schmucklose Kirche, mit nettem Bischof der heute zu Martini eine nette Kinder Segnung gemacht hat. Kirche selbst gibt nichts her.
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