Eisenstadt Cathedral

Eisenstadt, Austria

St. Martin's Cathedral in Eisenstadt was first mentioned 1264. From this chapel there are still remains of a Romanesque foundation in the area of the present choir. In the 13th century the chapel was extended by the addition of an early Gothic choir. In the 14th century a chapel for lay people was added. In 1460 the church was rebuilt under the town captain Johann Siebenhirter as a fortified or defensive church, as an attack by the Turks was expected after the Fall of Constantinople in 1453. The Gothic building was finished in 1522. After the great fire of 1589 almost 30 years passed before construction of the severely damaged church took place, between 1610 and 1629.

In 1777 a large altarpiece by Stefan Dorffmeister was added, depicting 'The Transfiguration of St. Martin'. In the following year the Viennese organ builder Malleck installed an organ to instructions from Joseph Haydn.

After the creation of the Diocese of Eisenstadt, St. Martin's Church was elevated to the rank of cathedral in 1960. Saint Martin became the patron saint of the diocese and the Land. Under Bishop Stephan László in 1960 the interior and windows were renewed.

The cathedral is famous for its church music. Concerts of the annual Haydn Festival also take place here.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessio Mavri (2 years ago)
A Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to Saint Martin. It has been the seat of the Bishop of Eisenstadt since the creation of the diocese in 1960. The cathedral is famous for its church music. Concerts of the annual Haydn Festival also take place here.
Attila Tényi (2 years ago)
Gótikus alapokon álló templom Máig megőrizte e stílus alapvető jegyeit. Belseje sem túldíszített.
Eduard Fikisz (3 years ago)
Sehr würdevoll
Mona Monamona (3 years ago)
Eine schöne Orgel und eine prächtige Barockkanzel....man muss es sich nicht ansehen
Heribert Schieg (4 years ago)
Schmucklose Kirche, mit nettem Bischof der heute zu Martini eine nette Kinder Segnung gemacht hat. Kirche selbst gibt nichts her.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.