Schloss Esterházy

Eisenstadt, Austria

Schloss Esterházy was constructed in the late 13th century, and came under ownership of the Hungarian Esterházy family in 1622. Under Paul I, 1st Prince Esterházy of Galántha the estate was converted into a baroque castle which remained the principal residence and center of administration of the family for over 300 years. The palace currently offers a wine museum, gift shop, guided tours, and concerts in the famous Haydnsaal as well as the large garden in the rear of the castle.

The Haydnsaal, originally the large multi-purpose festival and banquet room, is a piece of artwork in itself in the Schloss Esterházy. With its size and ornate splendor, it reflects the political, economic and cultural dominance of the Esterházy family. Today it ranks among the most beautiful and acoustically perfect concert halls of the world. Its name goes back to the famous composer Joseph Haydn, who worked for nearly forty years in the service of the Esterházy family. Many of his works composed and premiered in Eisenstadt and the Schloss Esterházy.

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Founded: 1620s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Darko Kukucka (2 months ago)
Beautiful place, so much to see, and learn about History... Really worth visiting ???
Wesley Wei (7 months ago)
beautiful palace, if you are lucky you will have a good concert inside!
Eben Coetzer (11 months ago)
Beautiful palace!
Ebenezer (11 months ago)
Beautiful palace!
Antonio Piretti TOZ - Songwriter (11 months ago)
Beautiful location, great garden.. and cool wine-selection bar in front..
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