Schloss Esterházy

Eisenstadt, Austria

Schloss Esterházy was constructed in the late 13th century, and came under ownership of the Hungarian Esterházy family in 1622. Under Paul I, 1st Prince Esterházy of Galántha the estate was converted into a baroque castle which remained the principal residence and center of administration of the family for over 300 years. The palace currently offers a wine museum, gift shop, guided tours, and concerts in the famous Haydnsaal as well as the large garden in the rear of the castle.

The Haydnsaal, originally the large multi-purpose festival and banquet room, is a piece of artwork in itself in the Schloss Esterházy. With its size and ornate splendor, it reflects the political, economic and cultural dominance of the Esterházy family. Today it ranks among the most beautiful and acoustically perfect concert halls of the world. Its name goes back to the famous composer Joseph Haydn, who worked for nearly forty years in the service of the Esterházy family. Many of his works composed and premiered in Eisenstadt and the Schloss Esterházy.

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Details

Founded: 1620s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Drossos Drossos (10 months ago)
A lovely Palace at the city center. Worth visiting!
Boriana Dineva (10 months ago)
Part of the world history and culture. Especially impressive is the Haydn hall - one of the music halls with best acoustic properties.
Timofei Tishkov (11 months ago)
Very very nice and quite place.
W. David (11 months ago)
Beautiful, but they could spend a bit more on the surrounding buildings... They are also part of their history...
David Rulloda (11 months ago)
I could only see it from the outside and it looks good!
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