Sommeregg Castle

Seeboden, Austria

Sommeregg is a medieval castle near Seeboden situated in the foothills of the Nock Mountains. The castle was probably erected in the 12th century. The Lords of Sommeregg then served as ministeriales of Count Otto II of Ortenburg, who ruled over extended estates in Upper Carinthia, rivalling with the House of Gorizia and the Salzburg archbishops.

In the 14th century, the Lords of Sommeregg achieved the knightly status of Ortenburg burgraves and castellans with comprehensive administrative and military responsibilities in the lordship of the manor. When the Counts of Ortenburg became extinct in 1418, their possessions passed to the Counts of Celje in Carniola, who left the administration of the remote Upper Carinthian estates to local stadtholders. In 1442 the Styrian noble Andreas von Graben by marriage inherited the Sommeregg burgraviate. His rights were acknowledged by Count Frederick II of Celje and the castle became a residence of the House of Graben.

The dynasty maintained the title of Sommeregg burgraves, even when the last Celje count Ulrich II was murdered in 1456. After a long dispute with Count John II of Gorizia, the former Ortenburg possessions fell to the Habsburg emperor Frederick III, who confirmed the feudal rights of the Graben family. Andreas von Graben was succeeded by his son Virgil in 1463, however, in 1487 the castle was occupied and devastated by Hungarian forces under King Matthias Corvinus on his campaign against the Austrian Habsburgs. Afterwards Virgil von Graben had the fortress rebuilt in its current appearance.

Through Virgil's niece and heiress Rosina (d. 1534), Sommeregg passed to the Bavarian Lords of Rain. In 1550 it was purchased by the Carinthian noble Christoph Khevenhüller, whose descendants held the castle until 1628. The Sommeregg manor was dissolved upon the Revolution of 1848.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick Gibbs (14 months ago)
A beautiful and historically fascinating 13th century castle nestled in the mountains. Very good food that won’t break the bank. Walk from Seeboden!
Eldar Israel Aslanbeily (14 months ago)
Very nice place
Raffy Aslanbeily (14 months ago)
Great burg and great museum of tortures
Jeremy Genicot (15 months ago)
Exquisite portions in a medieval setting. Highly recommended to lunch or dine.
Rosa G (15 months ago)
Nice castle with a good view. Torture museum is superb! A few stairs to climb though
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