Augarten Palace

Vienna, Austria

Palais Augarten was constructed in the late 17th century by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach on the site of a hunting château and gardens. In 1780 this palace came into the possession of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. Until the beginning of the twentieth century it remained in the possession of the Habsburg family. During this period, and especially in the nineteenth century, many balls were held in the palace, and a salon was opened. Among the guests at that time were Richard Wagner, Franz Liszt, and Hans Makart.

The greatest ball in the Palais Augarten took place on the occasion of the Viennese World's Fair of 1873; among the guests were Emperor Francis Joseph I and Czar Alexander II of Russia. In 1897 the palace was significantly remodelled for the family of Archduke Otto, the nephew of Emperor Francis Joseph.

Despite extensive damage suffered during World War II, the palace has been maintained almost in its original appearance, and many of the original furnishings can still be found there. Today, Palais Augarten is the home and rehearsal space of the Vienna Boys' Choir, who also have their own school there. The palace is located on 130-acre Augarten park, which is the oldest Baroque garden in Vienna.

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Details

Founded: 1692
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kathryn Platzer (2 years ago)
There is a special walled off area with picnic table and sandpit. ideal for children's parties. You can't book so go early to get the table and stake your claim.
stefan zeisler (2 years ago)
beautiful garden with a bunker in the middle.... nice for little walks and lying inthe sun
Lola Bee (2 years ago)
Interesting and beautiful baroque park where young Mozart gave his concerts,currently famous Vienna Boys Choir has got home there.Very good park cafe(entrance through the wall or from the park).Gloomy huge brown buildings dotted in the park were built by Nazis during the war.Apparently locals would like very much to get rid of them but the walls of those monsters are so thick that it is impossible to destroy them without damaging nearby houses.So they are standing there and reminding about the past.
Michael Wlaschitz (2 years ago)
One of the best parks of Vienna for a walk or run. One circle is 2,2km, so 3 of them make a great half an hour run!
Armin Obersteiner (3 years ago)
A nice garden with a pool for families, late night screaming of movies and picnics. No street lamps, so it's dark fast and super dark in winter.
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