Schönbrunn Palace

Vienna, Austria

Schönbrunn Palace is a former imperial summer residence located in Vienna. The 1,441-room Baroque palace is one of the most important architectural, cultural, and historical monuments in the country. The history of the palace and its vast gardens spans over 300 years, reflecting the changing tastes, interests, and aspirations of successive Habsburg monarchs.

The site of the Palace and Gardens of Schönbrunn is outstanding as one of the most impressive and well preserved Baroque ensembles of its kind in Europe. Additionally, it is a potent material symbol of the power and influence of the House of Habsburg over a long period of European history, from the end of the 17th to the early 20th century.

It is impossible to separate the gardens from the palace, of which they form an organic extension: this is an excellent example of the concept of Gesamtkunstwerk, a masterly fusion of many art forms.

A small hunting lodge and later summer residence of the Habsburg family was rebuilt after total destruction during the last Turkish attack in 1683. During construction work the project was expanded into an Imperial summer residence of the court. As such it represents the ascent and the splendour of the Habsburg Empire. At the peak of Habsburg power at the beginning of the 18th century, when imperial Vienna following the Turkish reflected its regained significance in spectacular examples of newly developing Baroque art, Schönbrunn was one of the most important building projects of the capital and residency.

The ample Baroque gardens with their buildings (Gloriette, Roman ruins etc.) and statuary testify to the palace's imperial dimensions and functions. The original intention, when they were laid out in the 18th century, was to combine the glorification of the House of Habsburg with a homage to nature. The Orangery on the east side of the main palace building is, at 186 m, the longest in the world. The Great Palm House is an impressive iron-framed structure, 114 m long and divided into three Sections, erected in 1880 using technology developed in England.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1740
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julie Go (16 months ago)
It is way more beautiful and bigger than I could imagine!!! The gardens, the alleys, the view of the whole city!!! Wow. Breathtaking. Plan to have at least 2-3 hours to explore outside. There’s a cute coffee shop at the other side of the palace alley for a quick snack.
Kris Krmpotich (17 months ago)
Loved it. Beautiful palace. Tons of rich history. Our tour was very interesting and educational. We went in July and really enjoyed it. I highly recommend this if you are in Vienna.
Sushma Roy (17 months ago)
The place is worth visiting in Vienna. Great example of Austrian opulence and lifestyle of Rulers. The audio tour of the palace is good to understand the details. The park behind the palace is open for public and the garden on the top gives a magnificent view of Vienna city.
Gomathy Natarajan (17 months ago)
Architectural stunner. Best time to visit would be summer and spring when the lawns are laid out with flower gardens. The place is over crowded with tourists and the ticket counter is always heavily queued up. Reachable by train from the city centre.
Lucia Malá (18 months ago)
I loved this place so much. Even though it was a bit crowded at the time of our visit, we didn’t seem to care because the palace was just so beautiful. And it’s not just the palace itself but its sourroundings that make it even more special. You could definitely tell that it’s being well taken care of, the gardens and the whole area around the palace were very clean and organized.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.