Hetzendorf Palace

Vienna, Austria

Schloss Hetzendorf is a baroque palace in Meidling, Vienna that was used by the imperial Habsburg family. The building was originally a hunting lodge. It was refashioned by the architect Johann Lucas von Hildebrandt. Empress Maria Theresa had it enlarged in 1743 by Nicolò Pacassi for her mother, Empress Elizabeth Christine, who lived here from 1743 until her death in 1750. A prominent feature of the palace is the entrance hall.

It was here that Maria Carolina of Austria, Queen of Naples died in 1814. She was the favourite sister of Marie Antoinette.

The youngest daughter of Emperor Francis II, Archduchess Maria Anna, lived here from 1835 until her death in 1858. She is said to have been mentallly retarded and to have suffered from a hideous facial deformity.

It was at Hetzendorf that future Empress Zita gave birth to her daughter, Archduchess Adelheid of Austria, in 1914. Adelheid was the second child of Empress Zita and future Emperor Charles I of Austria.

Today it houses a fashion school.

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Details

Founded: 1743
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kaiser Lena (5 months ago)
Beautiful!
Dasa Gaura Nitai (8 months ago)
We had a beautiful wedding ceremony here
Rafal Lipinski (9 months ago)
Amazing venue
Edis Kadric (9 months ago)
Amazing place, just like from movies.
Iris Mueck (2 years ago)
Very nice castle. Our car club had a rather long time the coffee shop selected for quarterly meetings. We enjoyed the nice environment.
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