The Korppoo Church was erected probably between years 1430 and 1440. It represents the oldest church architecture in Finland. Good example of this is the stone tower, which was probably built for defensive purposes, not for belfry. When the church was renovated in 1952-1953, several overpainted medieval wall paintings were found overpainted and restored.

The oldest wooden statue in Finland, "Korppoon madonna", was originally in the Korppoo Church. It was made in Rheinland approximately in 1225. Today the statue is preserved in National Museum of Finland (Helsinki).

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Founded: 1430-1440
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

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Peter Bergman (2 years ago)
Markku Miettinen (2 years ago)
Rauhallinen kivikirkko
Marko M (2 years ago)
Korppoon keskiaikaiseen kivikirkkoon tutustumiseen kannattaa varata aikaa etenkin silloin, kun "kaikki" muutkin ovat lomalla eli juhannuksesta elokuun alkuun. Kirkko nimittäin on mantereelta kahden lauttareitin takana, joten kyseinen päivä kannattaa uhrata ensi sijaisesti Korppoon, Nauvon ja Paraisten keskiaikaisten kirkkojen katseluun. Korppoon keskiaikainen kirkko on mantereelta katsoen kauimmainen, joten siitä on hyvä aloittaa. Korppoon kirkko on siitä harvinainen, että vain harvoissa Suomen kirkoissa on keskiaikainen kuori ja kuorirakennuksen esiintyminen osoittaa kirkon korkeaa ikää. Korppoon kirkko kuuluu niihin seitsemään Suomen keskiaikaiseen kivikirkkoon, jossa keskiaikainen kuori on säilynyt keskiaikaisessa asussaan. Kirkossa on myös keskiaikainen torni, jota on mahdollisesti käytetty puolustustornina, eli sitä ei rakennettu kelloja varten, vaan toimi linnoituksena, jonne paettiin levottomina aikoina. Nämä seikat jo sellaisenaan ovat näkemisen arvoisia. Muista näkemisen arvoisista asioista mainittakoon mm. alttarikaappi, useat pyhimyksiä kuvaavat puuveistokset ja 1400-luvulta peräisin oleva kuorilehteri.
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