Gaming Charterhouse

Gaming, Austria

Gaming Charterhouse (Kartause Gaming) is a former Carthusian monastery founded in 1330 by Albert II, Duke of Austria, who intended it as a dynastic burial place. He himself was buried there after his death in 1358, as was his wife Joanna of Pfirt (d. 1351) and daughter-in-law Elisabeth of Bohemia (d. 1373). The first community, from Mauerbach Charterhouse in Vienna, comprised a double complement, under a prior, of 24 monks rather than the usual 12, and the scale of the buildings from the beginning reflected the monastery's size. Gaming Charterhouse received extremely generous endowments from its founder, including much surrounding land in the valley of the Erlauf, and the town and market of Scheibbs.

The charterhouse was dissolved in 1782 in the reforms of Emperor Joseph II. In 1797 the bodies of the founder, his wife and daughter-in-law were removed to the parish church of Gaming, and in 1825 the monastery and estate, including large areas of forest, passed into private ownership. In 1915 it was bought by the abbot of Melk Abbey.

Today the renovated premises are partly occupied by a hotel and partly by Franciscan University of Steubenville (main campus in Ohio, USA). Since 2004 there has also been a museum, with displays of the history of Gaming Charterhouse and of the Carthusians in general.

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Address

Kartause 1, Gaming, Austria
See all sites in Gaming

Details

Founded: 1330
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

June Croft (2 years ago)
Wonderful accommodations!!
Radovan Mihok (2 years ago)
Just had cup of coffee. Nice staff. Peaceful place
Joe Pat (2 years ago)
Great place to visit and have a meal. Beautiful church to attend mass, and nice beer at the keller
Ainars Dominiks (2 years ago)
This is the place where I was learning English. It was Kartusian Cloister long time ago. Now there are some universities Franciscan and some part as hotel.
Pedro Monteiro (2 years ago)
Very nice environment on the countryside. Good food and very nice staff.
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