Gaming Charterhouse

Gaming, Austria

Gaming Charterhouse (Kartause Gaming) is a former Carthusian monastery founded in 1330 by Albert II, Duke of Austria, who intended it as a dynastic burial place. He himself was buried there after his death in 1358, as was his wife Joanna of Pfirt (d. 1351) and daughter-in-law Elisabeth of Bohemia (d. 1373). The first community, from Mauerbach Charterhouse in Vienna, comprised a double complement, under a prior, of 24 monks rather than the usual 12, and the scale of the buildings from the beginning reflected the monastery's size. Gaming Charterhouse received extremely generous endowments from its founder, including much surrounding land in the valley of the Erlauf, and the town and market of Scheibbs.

The charterhouse was dissolved in 1782 in the reforms of Emperor Joseph II. In 1797 the bodies of the founder, his wife and daughter-in-law were removed to the parish church of Gaming, and in 1825 the monastery and estate, including large areas of forest, passed into private ownership. In 1915 it was bought by the abbot of Melk Abbey.

Today the renovated premises are partly occupied by a hotel and partly by Franciscan University of Steubenville (main campus in Ohio, USA). Since 2004 there has also been a museum, with displays of the history of Gaming Charterhouse and of the Carthusians in general.

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Address

Kartause 1, Gaming, Austria
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Details

Founded: 1330
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kyle Hindle (12 months ago)
gaming moment
trunestor (15 months ago)
that's a gamer moment right there
Brennen Snow (2 years ago)
Nice quiet hotel in Gaming. I stayed 7 nights and ate dinner and breakfast there many times. All meals were amazing! The building and chapel were beautiful.
Josef Wanko (2 years ago)
Hotel and restaurant. Austrian old style hospitality with local dishes and an own brewery (draught, simple or mix). Located in an old monastery this hotel is a perfect starting point for tracking and walking. It offers rooms for seminars or even marriages in the own chapel. Fits for romantic twosomes up to 100 person celebrations. A lot of friendly staff, fast service and the products delivered from local producers make the visit an outstanding experience.
Rick Watts (2 years ago)
Nice hotel, very well run. Breakfast buffet was good as well as the two dinner we ate in the restaurant. Most of what they use comes from local farmers.
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